Class Notes (837,836)
United States (325,199)
History (216)
CAS HI 338 (13)
Lecture

1:23 - War and Aftermath

4 Pages
54 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
CAS HI 338
Professor
Michael Holm
Semester
Spring

Description
January 23 rd In the War’s Aftermath: 1945­1946 I. The Soviet Union a. was worried about by the United States as a competitor, not necessarily as  a violator of human rights or a perpetrator of inequality i. communism was also a system that had its goal on world  domination, like “the American way” b. after the war and Breton­Woods, America presumed that the Soviet Union  would abandon those aspirations and go the way of the United States, thus  being brought into the new world order c. the failure to do this was essentially what led to the Cold War II. The Potsdam Conference a. called in Germany at the end of the war in Europe (July 1945) b. as per the decision in Yalta, Stalin had already conceded to have free  elections in eastern Europe and that the Soviet Union would join the war  in Japan no more than 3 months after the end of the war in Europe c. following Roosevelt’s death, it falls on Truman to travel to Potsdam to  discuss with the other Allied leaders how to move forward postwar d. The Americans: i. Truman arrived less than two and a half months into office; was  vice president for fewer than 80 days – very much a novice, very  much expectant of Soviet cooperation and the ability of the U.N. to  solve problems ii. had never heard of Project Manhattan and was completely cut out  of Roosevelt’s inner circle: it was a full two weeks before the  Department of War/military advisers chose to brief Truman e. The British: i. both PM Churchill and soon­to­be PM Clement Attlee arrived in  the process of transitioning power ii. Churchill arrived hoping to salvage something of the British  empire; Atlee arrived willing to relinquish it f. The Soviets: i. had perhaps the most continuity; Stalin had been around since the  late 1920s ii. expected territorial gains in Europe, a big chunk of Germany,  military bases in Denmark and Norway, territorial gains in Asia,  wanted to be a part of occupying Japan, and had territorial  demands in Turkey and Iran 1. justified by the loss of 20 million people and their invasion  by Nazi Germany iii. hoped to bully Truman into giving up the goods g. The German Question i. after WWI, Germany had been allowed to survive as a political  entity, despite being stripped of money and territory; many felt that  the embarrassment of reparations paired with their retained  independence led to World War II ii. Germany was this time entirely occupied and run by a united front  of the four victorious powers, divided into four zones between  which there was no free movement iii. Berlin was also divided into four zones iv. General Lucius Clay, in charge of the American zone, believed it  was necessary to rebuild Germany (“de­Nazify”) and democratize  it, without overbearing punishment v. shared responsibility vi. expected to move towards democratic development h. The Japanese Question i. the war in Japan is still ongoing, and still being fought by America  against Japan alone ii. the day after Truman arrives in Potsdam, he learns via telegram  that the first atomic bomb has been successfully detonated in New  Mexico III. The American Decision  a. the bomb’s use fit a model of warfare that had theoretically been  developing for some time i.e. “strategic bombing” i. involved the direct targeting of the enemy’s homeland: factories,  agricultural centers, ports, roads, and if necessary, civilian  populations  ii. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command, was the  architect behind the U.S. strategic bombing campaign of Japanese  major cities iii. strategic bombing deliberately targeted civilians in nearly all of  Japan’s major cities during 1944 and August of 1945 iv. the theory rested on the assumption that no government would  allow its population to die in the tens of thousands, and that no  civilian population would allow a government to continue to die  while dying in the tens of thousands – however, this was a  fundamentally flawed theory 1. the result was that people would become more tenacious  about nationalism and redirect their antagonism, not to their  own government, but to that of the enemy 2. the government was also quite willing to allow their  population to die v. firebomb
More Less

Related notes for CAS HI 338

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit