Drugs, Lec 10.docx

5 Pages
69 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychological & Brain Sciences
Course
CAS PS 333
Professor
Barak Caine
Semester
Spring

Description
Drugs, Lec 10: 02/10/2014 Wednesday is the most important lecture, don’t be late!  Will talk about prescription pharmacology.  Today: watching case study videos.  Studies of guinea pig ilium because loaded with endorphins.  Heroin addicts and OxyContine addicts have problems with constipation. WE study their GI tract to study  the effects of opioids in their body. When in withdrawal, you get diarrhea. Hypothesis, maybe the GI tract is  loaded with endorphin.  Axon terminal, synaptic cleft and dendrites form a synapse.  Drugs affect synapses in 6 different ways:  1. Direct agonists:  Heroin is a direct agonist similar enough to endorphin that it fits into its receptor (called mu receptors) and  induces the effects of endorphin. Heroin contracts the GI tract, that’s why addicts usually have constipation. When you have diarrhea, you  take amodium. Which is a mu receptor agonist just like heroin and endorphin which contracts your  intestines so you don’t have diarrhea.  Neuropharmacology: synaptic mechanisms of drug action of direct agonists:  Heroin or morphine or oxycodone, all have almost similar molecular structure to endorphin so they can  directly activate the endorphin receptor. What they do? Direct agonists that directly mimic the  endogenous transmitter in the post­synaptic receptor.  2. Antagonists:  Fit into the receptor like a key that fits but doesn’t unlock the lock, keep other things from  activating the receptor. Doesn’t do produce an effect on its own. Ex. the endogenous  NT or a synthetic direct agonist. Make the receptors unavailable. Ex. Narcan, which is a narcotic  antagonist. Doesn’t only block endorphin but all other drugs that are direct agonists (heroin, oxycodone,  and morphine). Brain uses 20% of your body energy, even though it only makes up 5% of your BW. Na/K ATPase pumps,  or active transporters, use a third of that energy alone.  3. Reuptake inhibitors (SSRI): also called transport blocker or transport inhibitor.  There are proteins that grab NT that leaks away from the synaptic cleft an
More Less

Related notes for CAS PS 333

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit