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Lecture 31

FA 30B Lecture 31: Impressionism Lecture Notes
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Department
Fine Arts
Course Code
FA 30B
Professor
Unglaub Jonathan

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Impressionism Lecture Characteristics of Impressionism Claude Monet’s On the Banks of the Seine (“The River”) uses different hues of green in patches, as opposed to blending them. Monet’s landscape attacks the typical convention of the receding panoramic landscape that is exemplified in the paintings of Lorraine. Similarly, Monet abandons the theatrical landscape. The figure maintains the geometric simplicity used in the houses and background. The piece is both a landscape and an abstract series of patterns based on dabs of colors. Monet studies how light falls on surfaces through his use of colors. Central to the artist’s studies were the behavior and use of light and color. The depicted objects are simplified into geometric shapes. Capturing the light and color via an impression of a sight is the basis for Impressionism. Auguste Renoir Renoir’s Monet Painting in his Garden at Argenteuil shows Monet painting in his garden. The Impressionists often painted outside (at the time paint began to be produced in tubes and was more accessible). A strategic arrangement of marks creates a convincing representation from the seemingly abstract. Claude Monet and Impressionism Monet’s Impression: Sunrise and Boulevard des Capuchines were exhibited at the first Impressionist exhibition known as the Societe anonyme des artistes. Impression: Sunrise gave the movement its name. The critic Louis Leroy mocked the painting and movement by noting that wallpaper was more finished than the piece, and he demeans the painting by comparing it to decorative art (which held a lower status). The grey ground serves as a base for the dabs and strokes of the blues and oranges. Monet does employ decorative techniques, but does so to achieve pictorial effects. Impressionistic paintings face a para
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