Class Notes (836,321)
United States (324,456)
Anthropology (108)
ANTH 340 (1)
Lecture 9

ANTH 340 Lecture 9: Anthropology 2.10.17

10 Pages
65 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTH 340
Professor
Melody R Yeager
Semester
Spring

Description
Anthropology   ___  February 10, 2017    I. Economic Systems  ● Environment provides a template and the resources on which humans need to adapt and  survive (Remember ​culture​ is ​adapting ​ ​to the environment)​.  ● All societies have cultural customs specifying how individuals ​gain access to, convert,  and distribute ​natural resources  ○ Food, water, shelter  ○ Social items  ● Systems of exchange of items  ● Organization of labor to acquire and exchange materials  ○ Create units of survival and marriages in family  ● Social rules dealing with how materials can be acquired and exchanged      II. Economic exchange among foragers   ● Reciprocity  a. Generalized  b. Balanced  c. Redistribution  1. Reciprocity  ● Based on face-to-face (or almost) communication  ● As much about social relationships and building alliances as about getting  materials  ● Typical among and between small populations    A. Generalized Reciprocity  ● Sometimes called gift giving  ● Presentation of material without any expectation of return  i. No one keeps track closely  ii. Important to express friendship or family  ● Most common economic exchange within foraging communities  ● Ex:​ Giving a pencil to someone who needs it without expecting anything  in return  B. Balanced Reciprocity  ● Occurs between small groups that have regular contact  i. Can be direct or indirect contact  ● Items exchanged with socially known expectations of a return gift at an  appropriate time  ● Material exchanged builds alliances and trade networks  ● Ex:​ Needing a pencil and someone has a pencil and you have two  highlighters. So you trade, both parties feeling content.  C. Redistribution  ● Key materials moved to central authority  i. Central authority then gives out materials as sees fit  ● Works well with central authority and mid-sized populations (many  thousands)  ● Limited by the ability of central authority to control system  i. Potlatch of Northwest Coast Cultures  Quiz: Which form of reciprocity is most like trading?  A. Generalized  B. Balanced  C. Redistribution  D. Feasting    Quiz: in Foraging (Hunting & Gathering) which animals are used for labor?  A. Donkeys  B. Cattle  C. Pigs  D. None are used  III. Subsistence Practices: Pastoralism     ● Pastoralism  ○ Subsistence pattern in which people make their living tending herbs of large  animals  ○ Vary in different areas of the world but are all ​domesticated herbivores  ■ Live in herds  ■ Eat grasses  ● Domestication  ○ The ​systematic control over the reproduction of plants and animals ​coupled with  the maintenance or general tending of those resources to help ensure a good  harvest  ○ Domestication beings at about 11,000-13,000 before the present in the Near  East.   ○ Animal domestication increased available calories to humans through milk,  meat, manure fertilization, and pulling a plow  ○ The “Big Five”  ■ Goats  ■ Sheep  ■ Pigs  ■ Cows  ■ Horses  ○ Provided by Domesticated Animals  ■ Meat  ■ Milk Products  ■ Fertilizer  ■ Transport  ■ Leather  ■ Military assault vehicles  ■ Plow traction  ■ (Germs)  ○ Food Production: Pastoralists  ■ Animals vary  ● Cows, Massai  ● Goats, (Rajasthan, India)  ● Camels, Mongolia  ● Sheep, Basseri (S. Iran, goats - N. Iran)  ● Reindeer, Lapps (Scandinavia)  ● Pastoralists  ○ Requires high mobility, low population density… WHY?  ■ Herds must have fodder!  1. Nomadic Pastoralism, ​constant movement in search of food  2. Transhumance Pastoralism​, ​seasonal mobility from winters in sheltered  valleys to summers in highlands  ■ 1. Nomadic Pastoralism  ● Follow a ​seasonal migratory​ pattern that can ​vary from year to year  ● Migrations are ​determined primarily by the needs of the herd​ animals for  water and fodder  ● Do ​ not create permanent settlement​  but rather they live in tents or  other dwellings  ● Pastoral nomads are usually self-sufficient in terms of food and most  other necessities  ○ Trade is not necessary  ■ 2. Transhumance Pastoralism  ● Follow a ​cyclical​ pattern of migrations that usually take them to a cool  highland valleys in the summer and warmer lowland valleys in the winter  (Basseri of Iran)  ● This is ​seasonal migration​ between the ​same two locations​ in which they  have regular encampments or stable villages often with permanent  houses  ● Usually​ ​depend somewhat less on their animals for food ​ ​than do  nomadic ones  ● More likely to trade​ their animals in town markets for town markets for  grain and other things that they do not produce themselves  ■ General Features of Pastoralists  ● Small communities (but larger than foragers)  ● Trade is usually necessary for survival and for luxury items  ● Tend to be more differences in wealth and status than horticulturalists or  foragers  ○ Resources are owned and controlled by individuals  ○ Animals equate to wealth and status      I. Pastoralists  A. Adaptation  ● Pastoralism is most often an adaptation to semi-arid open regions  ● It is  usually the ​optimal subsistence pattern​ in these areas because it  allows considerable independence in any particular local environment  ● When there is a drought, pastoralists disperse their hers or move them to  new areas  a) This is especially true of ​nomadic pastoralism  B. Protein-Rich Diets  ● The animals is herded by pastoralists are rarely killed for family use  alone. Fresh meat is ​distributed through the community  ● This is the most efficient use of their animals because they usually ​do not  have the capability of adequately preserving meat  ● Most pastoralists also ​get food from their animals killing them  a) Horses, goats, sheep, cattle, and camels are milked  b) In East, Africa, cattle herding societies also bleed their animals  ○ The blood is mixed with fresh milk to make a protein rich  drink  C. Economics and Distribution  ● Not only does ​generalized reciprocity (sharing)​ ensure that no spoilage  takes place, but it also sets up numerous ​obligations to reciprocate  within the community  a) It promotes cooperation and solidarity  b) Often the slaughter of an animal is for a ritual occasion so that its  death serves multiple purposes; both spiritual and physiological  D. Gender Roles  ● Pastoralist societies most often have ​patrilineal (male’s side) descent  patterns and are male dominated  ● Men:   a) Make the important decisions  b) Own the animals  ● Women:  a) Primarily care for children  b) Perform domestic chores   ● Compared to foraging societies, the economic and political ​power of most  pastoralist women is very low  ● However, the division of labor is based primarily on gender and age in  both foraging and pastoralist societies  E. Rites of Passage/Marriage  ● Men in pastoralist societies acquire prestige and power by being brave  and successful in predatory raids as well as by accumulating large herds  of animals  ● Teenagers and young men are bachelor warriors. This is especially the  case among the Maasai, Kikuyu, Neur, and other cattle herders of East  Africa  ● They usually do not begin to acquire their own herbs until they become  elders  ● Older men marry younger women  ●
More Less

Related notes for ANTH 340

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit