Class Notes (836,293)
United States (324,410)
Chemistry (249)
CHEM 111 (69)
Lecture

Gas observations, kinetic-molecular theory, gas variables, units of pressure, volume vs. pressure, absolute zero, volume vs. amount

4 Pages
78 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Chemistry
Course
CHEM 111
Professor
Dana Johnson
Semester
Fall

Description
1 November Announcements Model assignment Intermolecular forces Due beginning of class 11/3 Refer to form to help shape your discussion Gas observations Low viscosity Does not resist flow Moves more easily than liquids and solids Generally low densities Measured in grams per liter Liquids and solid → grams per milliliter Miscible Mix together easily in any proportion Liquids depend on polarity Kinetic-molecular theory Postulate 1: particle volume Volume of the particles is much less than the volume of the container Gas is a collection of point masses with empty space between Postulate 2: particle motion Particles are in constant motion They move in straight lines until they collide with something Postulate 3: particle collisions Collisions are elastic Energy exchanges and direction changes Particles do not attract or repel one another 2 factors from the above Speed of motion Collisions give a variety of speeds at any one time Higher temperatures → faster average particle motion Origin of pressure Gas molecules move until they hit something Those collisions exert energy Pressure – Σ the energy of gas colliding with the container Gas variables State of a gas can be described as: Volume (V) Pressure (P) Temperature (T) Amount (n) P, T and n were shown to have specific linear relationships with V As a result, these are interdependent variables that combine to form the “ideal gas law” Units of pressure Pressure = force / area Newton (N) – SI unit of force, kg*m / s2 Pascal (Pa) – SI unit of pressure, M / m
More Less

Related notes for CHEM 111

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit