Comma use, labeling/crediting visual images, tightening sentences

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Department
Composition
Course
CO 301B
Professor
Christina Sutton
Semester
Fall

Description
12 November Comma uses based on sentence order Follow an introductory word, phrase or clause with a comma Set off sentence interrupters (middle of the sentence) with commas Interrupters also include words like “no” and names Commas before and after interrupters tell readers that the information not only drops into the sentence to interrupt the common order but also that it isn’t essential to the sentence. Commas in a series “Series” refers to a list of words of the same sort Adjectives Nouns Verbs Adverbs Sentences The series must have 3 of more items. If you have only two elements you’re combining, you don’t use a comma. Don’t overuse commas Over-using commas slows readers down. Commas in the wrong places signal readers about a possible sentence structure that isn’t there. We use “and” to connect items in a list or series. When you connect three or more elements, you really can’t go wrong if you use a commas with the “and”. We do not use a comma with “and” to connect any two items with one major exception: If you are connecting two sentences that could otherwise stand alone as complete sentences, use a comma when you use one of these seven combining words – but, or, yet, for, and, nor, so. BOYFANS Other connecting words, like however, moreover, and therefore, fall into a different category that conventionally calls for a semicolon when these words connect what would otherwise be two sentences. Labeling and Crediting Visual Images Unless a visual occurs solely to provide a text break and emotional tone, provide a caption with each visual. In the caption, tell readers what the image represents and point to the features you want readers to pay attention to. Unless the image is your own (i.e., you took the photograph or composed the graph/chart/image), provide a credit notation that attributes the image to the copyright holder. When one person contributes all the photographs in a text
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