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Lecture 1

E 305 Lecture Notes - Lecture 1: Parrhesia, Rhetorical Situation, Uptodate

13 pages91 viewsFall 2016

Department
English
Course Code
E 305
Professor
douglascloud
Lecture
1

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Cloud – E305 F16 – 1
E305: PRINCIPLES OF WRITING AND RHETORIC
Meeting Times: Tue/Thu 9:30AM-10:45AM in Military Sciences 115
Instructor: Dr. Doug Cloud
Office: Eddy 355
Office Hours: Mon/Wed/Thu 2:00PM-3:00PM and by appointment.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
What is rhetoric? How has our understanding of rhetoric and writing changed over time?
What does rhetoric do? Does rhetoric reflect or create reality? What role does rhetoric
play in relations of power? How does rhetoric shape (and get shaped by) identities? Why
do the answers to these questions matter, for your roles as professionals, citizens and
humans?
This course, a humanities-based exploration of central principles of writing and other
forms of rhetoric, attempts to address these and other vital questions in the scholarship on
rhetorical theory. Intended as a core course for students in the English department's
Writing, Rhetoric and Literacy Concentration, this class provides an introduction to
critical concepts, theories and moments in writing and rhetoric. The course considers
major theorists of written language, explores competing perspectives on a variety of
rhetorical issues (e.g., ethos, pathos, power, identity, style, etc.), and discusses various
approaches to rhetorical analysis of cultural artifacts.
REQUIRED TEXTS
Bizzell, Patricia and Bruce Herzberg, eds. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from
Classical Times to the Present. 2nd Edition. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's P,
2001.
REQUIRED ESSAYS AND BOOK CHAPTERS (AVAILABLE IN CANVAS OR RT)
(LISTED IN ORDER OF SCHEDULE)
Plato, excerpts from Phaedrus.
Aristotle, excerpts from On Rhetoric
Cicero, excerpts from De Oratore
Richard Weaver, “The Phaedrus and the Nature of Rhetoric”
Anonymous, Dissoi Logoi
Isocrates, “Against the Sophists”
John Poulakos, “Toward a Sophistic Definition of Rhetoric”
Lloyd Bitzer, “The Rhetorical Situation”
Richard Vatz, “The Myth of the Rhetorical Situation”
Friedrich Nietzsche, “On Truth and Lies in a Non-Moral Sense”
Norman Fairclough, excerpts from Language and Power
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Cloud – E305 F16 – 2
Pierre Bourdieu, excerpts from Language & Symbolic Power
Gloria Anzaldúa, excerpts from Borderlands/La frontera
Michel Foucault, excerpts from Fearless Speech
Ida B. Wells, “Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases, 1892.”
Jaqueline Jones Royster, “To Call a Thing by Its True Name: The Rhetoric of Ida B. Wells”
Quintilian, excerpts from The Orator’s Education
Ruth Amossy, “Ethos at the Crossroads of Disciplines”
S. Michael Halloran, “Aristotle’s Idea of Ethos, or If Not His, Someone Else’s”
Dana Anderson, excerpts from Identity’s Strategy
Mary Bucholtz & Kira Hall, “Identity and Interaction: A Sociocultural Linguistic Approach”
Hugh Blair, “Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres”
George Lakoff & Mark Johnson, excerpts from Metaphors We Live By
Sonja Foss, excerpts from Doing Rhetorical Criticism
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, “Justifying the War in Iraq…”
Doug Cloud, “Communicating Climate Change…”
Adam Smith, excerpts from The Theory of Moral Sentiments
Mark Garrett Longaker & Jeffrey Walker, excerpts from Rhetorical Analysis
George Loewenstein & Jennifer Lerner, “The Role of Affect in Decision-Making”
Kenneth Burke, excerpts from A Grammar of Motives
J.L. Austin, excerpts from How to Do Things with Words
Walter Ong, “Writing Restructures Consciousness”
Malea Powell, “Rhetorics of Survivance”
There will be other short readings assigned in class.
COURSE GOALS & OBJECTIVES
Goal 1:
Be able to identify, describe and apply critical concepts from theories of writing and
rhetoric.
Objective 1: Students will read and discuss some major theories from the Western
rhetorical tradition over the last 2500 years (class readings, class discussions).
Objective 2: Students will identify important aspects selected readings and discuss them
with one another (class discussion leadership).
Objective 3: Students will trace critical concepts across different authors and time periods
(class discussions, primary source précis, manifestos)
Objective 4: Students will complete an end-of-semester assessment to measure their
overall understanding of critical concepts in theories of writing and rhetoric
(comprehensive final exam).
Goal 2:
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Cloud – E305 F16 – 3
Be able to use rhetorical theory to understand the socio-cultural context surrounding the
language practices in your own lives (i.e. become “professional observers of things”).
Objective 5: Students will use the theories covered in this class to undertake an analysis
of a cultural artifact that 1) circulates widely, 2) has influence on their daily lives or the
life of someone they care about and 3) they identify as important (analysis of a cultural
artifact).
COURSE POLICIES
Academic Integrity and Coursework Expectations
The course will adhere to the Academic Integrity Policy of the Colorado State University General
Catalog and the Student Conduct Code. I take academic misconduct—and especially plagiarism
—very seriously. A general definition of plagiarism at CSU can be found at
writing.colostate.edu/guides under “Documenting Sources.” Confirmed incidences of plagiarism
or any other form of academic misconduct will result in a failing grade on the assignment and,
depending on severity, may result in automatic failure of the course. If you are confused about
whether something constitutes academic misconduct, remember that you can always ask me.
Remember also that the Writing Center at CSU is an invaluable resource for avoiding plagiarism,
and addressing the panic that sometimes drives good students to engage in academic misconduct.
The value of your education at CSU depends on the integrity of our academic culture. Note that
students should expect to do around two hours of outside work for each contact hour.
Attendance Policy
Since this course depends on your participation in class, attendance is required. Absences will be
excused for university-sanctioned events only, and appropriate documentation must be provided
in advance. You are also allowed three unexcused absences without penalty. You do not need to
provide documentation or an excuse, though I do encourage you to plan ahead whenever possible.
Do not use your allotted absences in a cavalier manner. Once they are gone, they are gone. Any
absences beyond your third will lower your participation grade by five points per absence.
Excessive tardiness will also impact your participation grade (see below).
If you miss a class meeting, you are responsible for contacting your peers for materials
and information you’ve missed.
A note on tardiness:
Everyone is late from time to time, but arriving even one minute after the start of class can be
disruptive to your classmates and may cause you to miss important information. I reserve the
right to count late arrivals (after the start of class but within the first ten minutes) as ½ absences.
If you arrive more than ten minutes after the start of class, you will be counted as absent for the
day.
Late Assignments
Unless otherwise noted, all assignments are due at the beginning of class. My policy is not to
accept late work unless accommodations have been made more than 24 hours in advance. If you
come up to me in class and tell me that your printer exploded or that some sort of animal
consumed your assignment, I might decide to bend my policy and accept your work. However,
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