Human Anatomy and Physiology.txt

3 Pages
81 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOL 208
Professor
Robert Whittaker
Semester
Winter

Description
The human body is the entire structure of a human being and comprises a head, neck, torso, two arms and  hands and two legs and feet. Every part of the body is composed of various types of cell.[1]At maturity, the  estimated number of cells in the body is given as 37.2 trillion. This number is stated to be of partial data and  to be used as a starting point for further calculations. The number given is arrived at by totalling the cell  numbers of all the organs of the body and cell types.  The study of the human body involves anatomy and physiology.  The composition of the human body shows it to be composed of a number of certain elements in different  proportions.  The average height of an adult male human (in developed countries) is about 1.71.8 m (5'7" to 5'11") and  the adult female is about 1.61.7 m (5'2" to 5'7") .[3] Height is largely determined by genes and diet. Body  type and composition are influenced by factors such as genetics, diet, and exercise.  Human anatomy  Anatomical study by Leonardo da Vinci  Human anatomy (gr. ??at??a, "dissection", from ???, "up", and t??e??, "cut") is primarily the scientific study  of the morphology of the human body.[4] Anatomy is subdivided into gross anatomy and microscopic  anatomy (histology)[4] Gross anatomy (also called topographical anatomy, regional anatomy, or  anthropotomy) is the study of anatomical structures that can be seen by the naked eye.[4] Microscopic  anatomy involves the use of microscopes to study minute anatomical structures, and is the field of histology  which studies the organization of tissues at all levels, from cells, cytology to organs.[4] Anatomy, human  physiology (the study of function), and biochemistry (the study of the chemistry of living structures) are  complementary basic medical sciences that are generally taught together (or in tandem) to students  studying medical sciences.  In some of its facets human anatomy is closely related to embryology, comparative anatomy and  comparative embryology,[4] through common roots in evolution; for example, much of the human body  maintains the ancient segmental pattern that is present in all vertebrates with basic units being repeated,  which is particularly obvious in the vertebral column and in the ribcage, and can be traced from very early  embryos.  Generally, physicians, dentists, physiotherapists, nurses, paramedics, radiographers, and students of  certain biological sciences, learn gross anatomy and microscopic anatomy from anatomical models,  skeletons, textbooks, diagrams, photographs, lectures, and tutorials. The study of microscopic anatomy (or  histology) can be aided by practical experience examining histological preparations (or slides) under a  microscope; and in addition, medical and dental students generally also learn anatomy with practical  experience of dissection and inspection of cadavers (dead human bodies). A thorough working knowledge  of anatomy is required for all medical doctors, especially surgeons, and doctors working in some diagnostic  specialities, such as histopathology and radiology.  Human anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry are basic medical sciences, which are generally taught to  medical students in their first year at medical school. Human anatomy can be taught regionally or  systemically;[4] that is, respectively, studying anatomy by bodily regions such as the head and chest, or  studying by specific systems, such as the nervous or respiratory systems. The major anatomy textbook,  Gray's Anatomy, has recently been reorganized from a systems format to a regional format, in line with  modern teaching  Human physiology  Main article: Physiology  Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, bioelectrical, and biochemical functions of  humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. Physiology focuses  principally at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous  to corresponding aspects of
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 208

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit