Social Psych - Class #11.docx

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Department
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Course
PS200
Professor
David Shim
Semester
Fall

Description
Class Notes: October 15, 2012 Self-esteem  (def) the degree to which the self is perceived positively or negatively  One’s overall attitude toward the self (self-evaluation process) 1) Self-reference effect 2) Self-serving bias – see self as higher than other people - “above average effect” - less in collective cultures  Pros/Cons of high/low self-esteem - High self-esteem can set people up for failure/disappointment by establishing high expectations; low self-esteem might actually allow people to succeed more - historical beliefs - Baumeister et al (1996) = high self-esteem is associated with bullying, narcissism, exhibitionism, self-grandizing; also don’t like to be challenged - Seery et al (2004) = refined Baumeister’s findings to people with high self-esteem and unstable outlook  Gender differences in self-esteem - Major et al (1999) = women have more self-esteem issues than men, especially in countries where they don’t have rights - Terrence Real: 1) Men’s = performance-based 2) Women’s = relationship-based (However, in sports, men are able to shake off losses better than women) Self-monitoring – how we “check in” with ourselves via our perceptual system  Allows us to adapt out behaviors to response to external impingements - high self-monitors = pay attention to external elements - low self-monitors = pay attention to internal elements Self-focusing = low self-monitors  Pay attention to internal stimuli  Seen as “stubborn, ego centric, eccentric”  High access to memor and cognitive process (can recall relevant self information and processes more readily)  High self Gender/Sex Framework  Sex – basic biological differentiation of males and females (determined biologically – XX or XY)  Gender – roles, actions, values, socially-norm attributes associated with a given sex 
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