Class Notes (1,100,000)
US (480,000)
FIU (1,000)
CLP (1)
Lecture 1

CLP 4134 Lecture Notes - Lecture 1: Birth Weight, Eugenics, Psychopathology


Department
Clinical Psychology
Course Code
CLP 4134
Professor
Jose Taque
Lecture
1

This preview shows pages 1-2. to view the full 8 pages of the document.
Chapter 1: Introduction to Normal and Abnormal Behavior in Children and Adolescents
Introduction
Research studies in abnormal child psychology seek to:
- Define normal and abnormal behavior for children of different ages, sexes, and
ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
- Identify the cases and correlates of abnormal behavior
- Make predictions about long-term outcomes
- Develop and evaluate methods for treatment and/or prevention
Features that Distinguish Child and Adolescent Disorders
When adults seek services fo hilde, it is ot ofte lea ho has hat pole
Many child and adolescent problems
- Involve a failure to show expected developmental progress
- Are not entirely abnormal
Interventions are often intended to promote further development
Historical Views and Breakthroughs
Ancient Greek/Roman view
- the disabled were a burden scorned, abandoned, or put to death
Before the 18th century
- Children were subjected to harsh treatment and largely ignored
By the end of 18th century
- Interest in abnormal child behavior surfaced
The Emergence of Social Conscience Locke and Itard
John Locke (17th century)
- Believed children should be raised with though and care, not indifference and harsh
treatment
Jean-Marc Itard (19th century)
- Focused on the care, treatment, and taiig of etal defeties
The Emergence of Social Conscience Hollingworth and Rush
Leta Hollingworth
- Distiguished idiiduals ith etal etadatio ieiles’ fo those ith
pshiati disodes luatis
Benjamin Rush
- Claimed that children were incapable of adult-like insanity
o Children with normal cognitive abilities but disturbing behavior suffer from
Moal isait
Early Biological Attributes
Late 19th century: mental illnesses were viewed as biological problems
- This was thwarted by the prevailing bias that the individual was at fault for deviant
or abnormal behavior
Cliffod Bees’ effots led to detetio ad iteetio
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com

Only pages 1-2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Early Biological Attributes Eugenics and Sterilization
Early 20th century: society reverted to a belief that disorders could not be influenced by
treatment or learning
- There was a return to custodial care and punishment of behaviors
Metal disodes ieed as diseases led to fea of otaiatio
- Eugenics (sterilization) and segregation (institutionalization) were implemented
Early Psychological Attributes Psychoanalytic Theory
Linked mental disorders to childhood experiences and surroundings
- Focused on the interaction of developmental and situational processes
Purported that mental disorders can be helped with proper environment or therapy
Retains a role as a model for abnormal child psychology
Early Psychological Attributes Behaviorism
Laid the foundation for evidence-based treatments
Key studies
- Palo’s eseah o lassial oditioig
- Watso’s studies o the eliiatio of hilde’s feas ad the theo of eotios
o Famous study: Little Albert
Evolving Forms of Treatment Psychodynamic Approaches
1930 to 1950: psychodynamic approaches prevailed
- Most children with intellectual or mental disorders were institutionalized
Late 94s: “pitz’ studies poited out the haful ipat of istitutioal life
1945 to 1965: institutionalization decreased
- placement in foster care and group homes increased
Evolving Forms of Treatment Behavioral Approaches
1950s and early 1960s: behavior therapy emerged as systematic approach to treatment
of child and family disorders
behavior therapy is a prominent form of therapy
Progressive Legislation IDEA
IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) requires:
- Free and appropriate public education or children with special needs in the least
restrictive environment
- Each child must be assessed with culturally appropriate tests
- An individualized education program (IEP) for each child
Progressive Legislation The UN
United Nations General Assembly (2007) adopted a new convention to protect the
rights of persons with disabilities
- The convention supports the attitude of considering persons with disabilities as
individuals with human rights
What is Abnormal Behavior in Children and Adolescents
Childhood disorders are accompanied by various layers of abnormal behavior or
development
Must also e sesitie to eah hild’s stage of deelopet
Disorders are commonly viewed as deviances from normal
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

- Boundaries between normal and abnormal functioning are arbitrary
Defining Psychological Disorders
Patterns of behavioral, cognitive, emotional, or physical symptoms linked with one or
more of the following
- Distress
- Disability
- Increased risk for further suffering or harm
Culture and circumstances matter
The characteristics describes behaviors, not causes
Labels Describe Behavior, Not People
Stigmatization is a challenge
- Separate the child from the disorder
- Poles a e the esult of hilde’s attepts to adapt to aoal o unusual
circumstances
According to DSM-5 guidelines
- The primary purpose of using terms is to help describe and organize complex
features of behavior patterns
Competence
The ability to successfully adapt in the environment
- Successful adaptation is influenced by culture and ethnicity
Abnormal child psychology considers:
- The degree of maladaptive behavior
- The extent to which normal developmental milestones are met
o Knowledge of developmental tasks provides important background
information
Examples of Developmental Tasks
Infancy to preschool
- Attachment to caregiver(s)
- Language
- Differentiation of self from environment
Middle Childhood
- Self-control and compliance
- School adjustment (attendance, appropriate conduct)
- Academic achievement (e.g., learning to read, do arithmetic)
- Getting along with peers (acceptance, making friends)
- Rule-governed conduct (following rules of society for moral behavior and prosocial
conduct)
Adolescence
- Successful transition to secondary schooling
- Academic achievement (learning skills needed for higher education or work)
- Involvement in extracurricular activities (e.g., athletics, clubs)
- Forming close friendships within and across gender
- Forming a cohesive sense of self-identity
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version