PSC 2442 Lecture Notes - Lecture 3: International Criminal Court, Middle Power, United Nations Secretariat

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26 Mar 2020
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Course
October 11th, 2017: Middle Powers and International Organizations
Introductory Thoughts
Power is vested in money and military might
Middle powers have less of these two things
They work together, with greater powers, and even against greater powers to
make change, even when they are less powerful
Defining middle powers
Very difficult, most simply, somewhere in the middle in a hierarchy of power
(realism)
May be traditionally middle powers or “rising” powers
Flexible and often changing
They are mostly self-defined
Working Definition: Keohane
“Middle power a state whose leaders consider that it cannot act alone effectively,
but may be able to have a systemic impact in a small group or through an
international institution”
There are three major ways of characterizing middle powers
Hierarchically
Normatively
Functionally
What do middle powers do
Use soft power instead of military power → spread culture and influence
Come together in coalitions, most arent formally institutionalized
Coalition examples
Ottawa treaty - anti personnel mines
International criminal court
Responsibility to protect
Middle Power Initiative
These all reflect both normative and functional characteristics
Other Middle power influence
Contributions to alliance active, engaged, committed, give money and supplies
MP without lots of money often have highly educated people that care
about these causes
UN Secretariat
Diplomatic Groups
Peacekeeping
Canada
Tiny in terms of population, not that economically powerful
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