Celts 10-24.docx

3 Pages
119 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Celtic Languages and Literatures
Course
Celtic Languages and Literatures Celtic 103
Professor
Catherine Mc Kenna
Semester
Fall

Description
George Buchanana – 1582 – firstb ook that talks about the Scots as celts  Rerum scotticarum  historia. Paul­Yves Pezron – L’antiquité de la langue et de la nation des Celtes (1703) (The Antiquities of  Nations, more particularly of the Celtae or Gauls, Taken to be Originally the same People as our  Ancient Britons, 1706). Was there already a military British colony in the late Roman era? We don’t  know. Pezron was a Breton.  Books about Celts are coming from people with backgrounds in Celtic countries Edward Lluyd, Archaelogia Britannica, 1707, Welsh.  So far, everyone but the Irish writing about this! Identity of Britishness, idea of Briton, taken away from Scots and Welsh and reassigned for all  people of the island.  John Toland – A History of the Druids, 1726, 1747 (Toland was Irish) – working up this druid­mania,  connecting druids with ancient monuments William Stukeley, History of the Ancient Celts, 1740, 1743. First volume about Stonehenge as a  druid monument, second volume about another megalithic stone circle in Southwestern Britain  (Maybury?)  What’s happening is increasing enthusiasm for Celtic past, and that gives rise gradually to a kind of  fascination with the Celtic­speaking peoples understood to be their descendants.  th Mid 18  century comes the big  deal – James Macpherson, 1736­1796. Born in Scottish highlands. Fragments of ancient poetry, collected in the highlands of Scotland and tr. From the Galic or Erse  language, 1760 15 short poems translated into a rhythmic prose. This was an enormous success. These books,  along with Fingal and Temora, translated into every European language, extolled by famous people  of the era, Napoleon carried Fingal with him aound to battle, Goethe was a fan of Macpherson.  Macpherson said that these poems he translated, that he translated them from ancient manuscripts  1200 years old (so, claiming manuscripts from 500 and something CE). But, criticisms – a lot of  questioning of his authenticity in Ireland, Wales, London, where his most famous critic, Samuel  Johnson, having been to western Isles to see what was going on re: manuscripts and poetry, said  Macpherson was a fraud and that the poems were forgeries. He said any man, woman, or child  could write it, Ossian (hero of Fingal/Temora) was a waste of time, and Galic was a barbaric  language of which there were no manuscripts. Still, Macpherson was very successful.  He later wrote that many of his sources were from oral tradition, that Celtic peoples didn’t come into  their own written language until middle ages but that they had a very strong oral tradition. He  backed off claim a bit from having found written sources, which he had claimed early because  people found it most reliable. After Macpherson, the collection of folklore or oral tradition became a  very important literary activity.  Privileging of long, heroic, narrative poetry because if there is great ancient poetry, it’s Homer. We  want a Scottish, Celtic homer, basically. Are there long, epic, narrative poems in Celtic tradition?  Not so much. Long heroic stories? Yes. Poems? Yes, but not particularly narrative.  Fingal, 1761 Temora, 1763 James II of England who was James VI of Scotland converted to Catholicism – did not make  English Parliament happy at all because reformation established under Elizabeth. Parliament  deposed him and invited his daughter, Mary and her husband William of Orange. But, many in  Scotland remained loyal to James, especially Catholics of Scotland. But not entirely on Sectarian  lines, more highlanders than lowlanders supported James, more highlanders than lowlanders were  Catholic, but the attraction of James was both that he was Catholic (if they were Catholic) and that  he was Scottish. Several risings against William and Mary in 1689. There was a battle the  highlanders won, and then s
More Less

Related notes for Celtic Languages and Literatures Celtic 103

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit