CB50 10-2.docx

3 Pages
114 Views
Unlock Document

Department
General Education
Course
General Education Culture and Belief 50
Professor
Peter Gordon
Semester
Fall

Description
Gillo Pontecorvo’s “La Battaglia di Algeri” (1966) Algerie francaise. It was considered a part of French. Didn’t prevent that in French imagination, the  populations they were controlling were backward, exotic. Long tradition in European imagination to  look at other parts of the globe as exotic but also alluring, sexually. Especially true of Islamic “east”  – called “Orientalism” French Algerians – thought of their Algerian identity as just as important, just as integral as their  French identity. This was true with Camus.  So, they wanted to hold onto what they thought of as their homeland, too French Algerians begged Charles de Gaulle to come back to power, so he did, solidified  presidential power, declared 5  Republic in which presidential power much more centralized. Within  a few years, he actually concluded that French hold over Algeria was impossible. Algerian longing  for independence was too great, FLN too strong Battle of Algiers – 1956­57. This was only one pitched, protracted battle in a long war against  French control, and that battle ended in failure. Demoralized the French, though.  Independence came in July 1962 Film Premiered in 1966. Its directed was Pontecorvo. Lived in France for a while during war and then  moved to Italy again to fight fascists Heavily influenced by Rossalini, Italian neorealism Pontecorvo remained throughout his life a fierce opponent to anything conservative, remained  attached to communist party until 1956 (Hungarian crackdown) Battle of Algiers went through several script revisions – took a long time for Pontecorvo and  screenwriters to reach some conclusion about what exactly the film was they wanted to make.  In original script, protagonist would be former paratrooper, Frenchman, now a magazine reporter.   His role was to slowly awaken to brutality of French army. To be played by Paul Newman (Butch  Cassidy). But, Pontecorvo resisted this attempt, he wanted to make a film more neorealist with  mostly unknown actors, the “dictatorship of truth” It appears to be a documentary, and it’s so effective that one occasionally loses one’s bearings and  feels that one is simply watching a documentary, watching truth unfold.  Contrasts are sometimes very extreme in a way that makes it look like newsreel footage. By this point, films were quite often in color. Pontecorvo was resisting the desire to satisfy  bourgeois taste for images that one could absorb in pleasure. This is an austere film, resists the  idea that it’s for pleasure, stays in “factual, documentary” mode General impression in the film is that you are caught up in the action. Protagonists seem to be the  women, children, etc, running through the streets of the Casbah. Used a very popular technique  today, the handheld camera. Despite that impression, we know that Pontecorvo chose for at least one or two roles in the film,  individuals who were well known, including Jean Martin (Colonel Matthieu) – Jean Martin had   been in original, Paris premier of Waiting for Godot as Lucky in 1953. The other well known person  was Saadi Yacef as El­hadi Jaffar – El­hadi Jaffar was fictitious, but Saadi Yacef was, in fact, a  member of the FLN himself. He played a fictitious character modeled closely after himself.  Many people did not like what the film had done – too equal, too fair to both sides, they said. He  didn’t want to reduce the moral complexity. He rejected a script made by an exiled member of FLN  as too propagandistic, but we know his sympathies were with colonial rebellion French felt that this was a “how to” guide to conducting a rebellion – there was a protests in the  street of French military and pieds­noirs) repatriated French Algerians). The film was banned in  France for its first five years. Nonetheless, it won the Golde
More Less

Related notes for General Education Culture and Belief 50

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit