CB50 10-16.docx

2 Pages
81 Views
Unlock Document

Department
General Education
Course
General Education Culture and Belief 50
Professor
Peter Gordon
Semester
Fall

Description
Legacy of 1968: Rebellion against authoritarianism and bureaucracy in east and west Perspective in Judt: Judt was a social democrat, but fiercely independent in political sensibilities.  Critical of French left, praised British left, great sympathy for Eastern Europe at the time. He never  developed romanticized idea of Maoism or neo­Marxism that captured some members of new left.  Very critical of Parisian intellectuals.  Events of 1968 have symbolized cultural fracture that has never been healed. New kind of militant,  conservative ideology developed in US – this conservative rebellion was in part an allergic  response to cultural innovations of 1968. True in Europe as well. One of the major reorientations was sexual revolution, but also effected labor rights and power of  labor movements to organize 1968 in the East: The Prague Spring violent clash with Soviet establishment Antonin Novotny came into power in Czechoslovakia after Krushchev rejected Stalin’s crimes,  opened a kind of freedom in satellite states, relaxed scriptures on free speech, perhaps allow other  political parties, a de­Stalinization took place.  1968, Alexander Dubcek came to power as head of Communist Party in Czechoslovakia. He  confronted student protests at Charles University in Prague. Novotny forced to step down, Dubcek  named official successor as chairman At first, he was a conformist. Presided a ceremony commemorating events when Soviet Union  brought communism to Czechoslovakia right after WWII. But, Dubcek had reformist tendencies  and, in the climate of student rebellion, carried beyond his own intentions. Eventually presided over  set of reforms, carnivaliesque atmosphere of rebellion in the streets called “the Prague Spring” Dubcek spoke of a new moderation in Socialist regime in Czechoslovakia, called for “Socialism with  a human face” – non­Communist groups permitted to assemble, perhaps participate in elections.  Dubcek called to Moscow, seemed like he had mollified the Soviets, hugely popular in  Czechoslovakia, but on 20  of August 1968, Soviets invaded.  Why? Partly due to fear Czechoslovak withdrawal from Warsaw Pact. Feared crumbling of Eastern  Bloc military alliance that was facing off against NATO.  Czechoslovakia had pivotal geographical position, so Soviets came in with troops and tanks.  Czechs responded with passive resistance and “playful” feats of symbolic and ironic rebellion.  Czechs would sneak out at night and paint the tanks pink.  By 1969, this was all over. Dubcek ousted, and a conformist leader Gustav Husak was installed.  1968 in the West: Students and Labor in Paris Given the torture, labor camps, etc, probably extremely irresponsible to have a romance with  Maoism and Communism in the west. Nonetheless, these events have own legitimacy in the West  because of reorientation brought to politics. Events of May 1968 in Paris are so famous, so important in French memory, that French who  participated in those rebellions are known only as ‘68ers. (Soixante­huitards). Aging romantic  authority for some youth. Began in part as a protest against ba
More Less

Related notes for General Education Culture and Belief 50

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit