OEB 119 11-4.docx

2 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Course
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 119
Professor
Peter Girguis
Semester
Fall

Description
(Or three.) Molecular, morphological, and biorobotic approaches to understanding evolution in the deep sea Right off of Cape Cod, about 100 nautical miles, there is the extinct volcano chain, including Bear  Seamount, one of oldest chains in the world Gulf Stream (warm) and Labrador Stream (cold) intersect here. Likely that Beebe suffered from narcosis… described 6 foot long dragonfishes, but we’ve only  captured up to 2 ft.  Three major groups of deep sea fishes: stomiiforms, myctophiforms, and macrourids.  Stomiidae: 28 genera, 280 species with more described every year, lots of photophores, hyoid  barbels. Big teeth, well adapted to capturing large prey items. Two important parameters of organisms in mesopelagic and bathypelagic: lack of light and lack of  biomass (for food). This has shaped evolution of animals living here. Lack of biomass related to  lack of light: less primary production because of absence of light. Biomass is bimodal – due to diel vertical migration. Up at night to feed, down at day to hide. Typical prey: myctophids.  ~58­230% of annual standing stock – means that these fish have to reproduce twice a year to keep  up with predation. Often, length of prey item exceeds half the body length of the dragonfish.. Mean prey: 37.5% One hypothesis: use “rat­trapping” morphology of teeth – enormous gapes (some close to 180  degrees) – impale prey item with teeth, but the problem is getting the prey off the teeth. This is how they deal with biomass problem: when they feed, they eat something big when  possible. Limited light Light that penetrates water is differentially occluded. Red, purple, low wavelength blue, occluded,  so you have a blue­green peak that penetrates water column.  So, animals use this light in different ways: blend into downwelling light Animals also see in those same frequencies. Deeper one goes, the more one sees a bit of a shift One exception: loosejaw dragonfishes. They produce red light, not blue green light. Several  hypotheses: if their prey cant see red light because attuned to blue­green, then they don’t know  they’re being illuminated. M. niger.  Called loosejaws because have no skin between man
More Less

Related notes for Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 119

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit