OEB 167 2-18.docx

3 Pages
94 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Course
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 167
Professor
Jonathan Losos
Semester
Spring

Description
Major lizard clades Iguania Contains traditionally three families Iguanidae (primarily New World) Split into many different families recently, 12 different families. And one of new families has same  name as whole group! Now the group is renamed “Pleurodonta” – teeth exposed on inside of jaw  margin. Vs chameleons and agamids (acrodonta) Whole group is called iguanians.  It has primitive reptilian condition – very robust skull. Complete postorbital bar, upper temporal bar  is present.  Iguanians share several traits with tuatara that are believed to be primitive, even though tuatara not  believed to be primitive Robust, non­reduced skull Four­legged Generally insectivorous, sit­and­wait Terrestrial and arboreal (varied habitats), but not really burrowers Visually oriented, territorial Because visually oriented and territorial, not surprising that they have the most elaborately ornate  features. Very little similar things in other lizards – probably because SO visually oriented. Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) – found throughout much of North America, blue  bellies (because of blue belly). Very typical. Insectivorous, medium sized. Most frequently seen  lizard in N. America Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum) – flat, with big belly. They eat ants – not much  nutrition, so have to eat a lot of them. Ruptures blood vessels around eyes to repel canine  predators.  Aspects of iguanid diversity Locomotion: most run in typical quadrapedal manner. But, some are bipedal like zebra tail.  Basilisks take it to the extreme – run on water bipedally – fringes on toes like snow shoes. Fringes  have evolved several times, primarily for sand running Carnivory Most eat insects, but many are carnivorous, eat small vertebrates. Only one, the leopard lizard, is  exclusively a carnivore, eats exclusively lizards and snakes, etc.  Herbivory Iguanas are exclusively herbivorous – green iguana, desert iguana.  Adaptations: vegetation is not very nutritious, so they have to eat lots. Need a big stomach, and  need to move food through intestines slowly to have enough time to extract nutrients. So, very long  intestinal tracts. And many species have evolved obstructions in short intestine – slow down passage through gut.  Teeth for chopping vegetation – pointy tricuspid teeth.  Finally, like most herbivorous vertebrates, get help digesting cellulose through microbes. So how  does baby iguana get microbes? Baby iguanas search out iguana poop and eat it.  Anolis. Dewlaps and toepads. Agamidae (Old World counterparts to iguanidae) Essentially look the same as iguanidae, just the Old World counterpart Frilled lizard – a meter and a half long. Australia Thorny Devil or Moloch – also from Australia. Covered with spines which are incredibly sharp.  Australian counterpart of horny lizard – eats ants, squat. Convergent evolution. (but doesn’t shoot  blood out of eyes) Draco – flying dragon. Glides long distances. Elongated ribs that normally lie by the side of body,  but lift them and can glide. Ribs extend outside of body wall. They also have little things at neck for  rudders, and a little dewlap. (They display with dewlap and stick out patterns on wings when  courting female) Chamaeleonidae 130 species of chameleons. 2/3s occur in Madagascar, where the genus evolved. Most of the  remainder are in Africa, but also in Southern Europe (Spain and Greece) and one species in India. Even the ones on the ground have the typical foot structure Tongues – can shoot out length of body to capture prey. Renowned for ability to change colors. Anoles can change to some extent, but none match  chameleon. Still, no real good evidence that they match background. But, they do exhibit emotion:  green or bright means dominance, dark brown or black tends to 
More Less

Related notes for Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 167

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit