EDP 256 Lecture Notes - Lecture 4: Universal Design, Ableism, Differentiated Instruction

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Class Discussion
Wheelchair user vs. wheelchair bound
A person who uses a wheelchair, gives them mobility
A person who is wheelchair bound makes people feel trapped
Person first language vs. identity first
Person first language: 1980s-1990s very recent history. They are people
first, but have disabilities
Identity first: reaction against the medical model of disability. Claiming
disability as identity and seeing it as a source of pride
Ask the individual how they identify with the different language types
Disabled is not a bad word
Not differently abled: EVERYONE HAS DIFFERENT ABILITIES
Handicapped is a slur...seen as beggars with their cap in hand
Specific community of people who have historically been oppressed and continue
to be oppressed, disabled allows people to be out in the world and be proud
They don’t need special: they need education opportunities, friends, and love just
like everyone else
Inclusion
Inclusion is on the rise and educating many more students with disabilities
To be fully included students with disabilities need to spend 80% of their school
day with gen education material
61% of students with disabilities have fully inclusive education
Think of inclusion as a civil right, or as a choice depending on the student. They
just aren’t one teachers student they are everyone's students
Inclusion can be challenging: have to change some teacher philosophies,
people's preferences, etc…
Won’t change overnight, just have to keep making slow progress and building
strong relationships with the team of educators you work with
UDL: universal design for learning: they can be included without the need to
retrofit original plans
Social Justice for Students with Disabilities
Social justice is a man-made legal system to give or remove privileges to a
certain group in society
All levels of society should work together to make sure everyone gets what they
need without resorting to competition or violence
Civil rights movement in the US began with African Americans and quickly
spread to others who were considered “second-class citizens”
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