Class Notes (835,490)
United States (324,146)
Physiology (63)
PSL 250 (57)
Dillon (7)
Lecture

PLS 250 L4-5.docx

10 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physiology
Course
PSL 250
Professor
Dillon
Semester
Spring

Description
PLS 250  01/16/2014 L4: Membrane Structure  Membrane Structure  Separates intracellular fluid (ICF—fluid inside the cell) from interstitial fluid (IF—fluid surrounding the cell)  Physical and chemical barrier  Phospholipids  Backbone of membranes  Soap­like  Fluidity: within membrane and as a whole  Heads: negatively charged, polar, hydrophilic  Head covered in sugar Oriented towards the intracellular fluid and the interstitial fluid   Tails: uncharged, non­polar, hydrophobic  Prevents water­soluble particles from entering the cell  Form the lipid bilayer  Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic  Fat soluble center of the membrane  Hydrophobic molecules cross easily (their only difficulty is getting to the membrane)  Oxygen Carbon dioxide  Hydrophilic outer sides of membrane  Salts, carbohydrates, etc.  Hydrophilic molecules do not cross by diffusion  Water can get across membrane easily  High water solubility due to small size  Cholesterol  Interspersed between lipid portions of the phospholipids  OH group in cholesterol anchor it between the phospholipids  Prevents close packing of fatty acid chains  Create membrane fluidity (flexibility)  Prevents membranes from rupturing  Proteins—in membranes  Some mobile, some restricted  Receptors  On outside of cell  Bind to solute, either chemical (neurotransmitter, hormone, drug) or ion  Some activated by physical change (touch)  Activate either channel or enzyme  Channels  Only ions go through  Protein channels span membrane  Open or closed  Specialized by ion type: K+, Na+, Ca++, Cl­ (there’s less chloride than the wholes  Receptors open channels  Enzymes  Catalyze reactions  Some activated by receptors, some always active  Docking­Marker Acceptors  On the inside of a cell membrane  Recognize and bind to secretory vesicles  Sites of exocytosis  Carriers  Flexing proteins (revolving door), no ATPase  Alternate opening each side  2 types:  Molecules move with gradient  Co­transport with ion usually Na+  Use ion gradient for energy source  A lot of sodium outside cell, less sodium inside cell  Other molecules can get across by coming through with the sodium  Carbohydrate­Protein Complexes  Identify self to immune system  Basis for separation of cells into tissues during embryonic development  Limit normal tissue growth to confined region  Keep proteins in place—prevent proteins from rotating  Always on outside of cell  Intercellular Connections  Proteins and large structures  CAMs—Cell Adhesion Molecules  Proteins  Anchor cells to other cells or to basal lamina (non­cellular surface)  Maintain tissue integrity  Abnormalities occur during metastatic cancer  Control cell migration  Tight Junctions (imagine a six pack of cans linked by plastic ring)  Block movement between cells  Create tissue sidedness  Primarily on edges of body  Skin Intestines Kidneys  Forms ring around cells  Allows selective transport, molecules must go through cells  Desmosomes  Cellular rivets  Holds moving cells together that are under physical stress  Skin  Heart  Gap Junc
More Less

Related notes for PSL 250

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit