3.3.13.docx

10 Pages
84 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTHRO 4300
Professor
Shenk
Semester
Fall

Description
Comparative Social Org 03/03/2014 Political Organization  Social differentiation  The relative access individuals and groups within a society have to material resources, wealth, power, and  prestige  There are no societies in which all individuals are treated or regarded equally; social differentiation of some  kind always exists  The differences between societies lie in how much differentiation occurs and how persistent it is over time  Three main types of societies are usually described in the anthropological literature  Egalitarian Society No individual or group has more formal or systematic access to resources, power, or prestige than any  other  No one is barred from access to resources  No one has formal power over others No fixed number of social positions for which individuals must complete  This does not mean that all people are regarded or treated equally by others Usually differences in social status by age, sometimes by gender, often by individual abilities  Associated with horticulturalist societies  Ex: Ju’hoansi/!Kung  All individuals have equal right to hunt and forage in the bush  There are no formal or hereditary leaders Group decisions are arrived at by consensus  Individuals can leave group if there are conflicts  Positions of prestige usually obtained through personal abilities and interest  Good hunter or forager, shaman or healer  Rank Society  Institutionalized differences in prestige and symbolic resources  Often two­tiered social system (elite and commoners) based partly on heredity  No restrictions on access to basic resources, though often mediated through kin group Associated with horticultural or pastoralist societies with a surplus of food Associated with chiefdoms Redistribution important mode of exchange  Ex: Haida  Two moieties (raven and eagle) and many lineages within each Matrilineal descent with primogeniture  Chiefs were men but inheritance went to their eldest sister’s oldest son Members of a lineage shared a large house; higher ranking people more closely related to the lineage head  Chief was often the head of the most­powerful lineage  Three ranks  Chief/elites  Commoner  slaves  mainly war captives held by high ranking members  People of high rank marry others of high rank, usually elites from other clans  Rank endogamy, rank isogamy  Maintains distinctions between ranks  Stratified Societies  Formal, long­lasting social and economic inequality between individuals and/or groups Characterized by differences in standard of living, security, prestige, and political power Subsistence pattern based on intensive agriculture and/or industrialism  Associated with state societies Modern industrialized countries  Complex, urbanized and feudal societies  Method of stratification and degree dependent Stratification system: Caste system: based on birth in which strata are ranked hierarchically and movement between them is  either not possible or very difficult  Ascribed status> achieved status  Class system: different strata form a continuum and social mobility is possible  Though it may be difficult  Achieved status> ascribed status  Ex: Medieval Japan 12 ­19  centuries  Emperor Ritual head of state  Shogun Military ruler  Daimyo  Lords  Samurai  Warriors  Peasant farmers Artisans Merchants  Burakumin (outcasts) Priests (above or outside)  Types of Political Organization  Four ideal types described by Elman Service in Primitive Social Org and the Origins of State and  Civilization Based on amount of social differentiation and degree of social complexity  Social complexity: cultures described as more or less complex  based on: Number or subgroups (ethnic group) Degree of social hierarchy within and between subgroups Degree of urbanization, size/density of the population Number, size, and complexity of formal social and governmental institutions  Concepts are controversial but influential Typologies  The use of typologies in anthropological research is controversial  Two primary positions: Inaccurate or ideologically inappropriate  Simplify complex realities in misleading ways  Negative association with unilineal evolutionism More commonly associated with humanistic paradigm Necessary asp
More Less

Related notes for ANTHRO 4300

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit