Class Notes (786,433)
United States (302,135)
Economics (72)
George (12)
Lecture

Econ in the News 2.docx

8 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

School
University of Missouri - Columbia
Department
Economics
Course
ECONOM 1051
Professor
George
Semester
Fall

Description
Econ in the News: Week 6 ­short run: period of time during which at least one of a firm’s inputs is fixed (when you  cant change anything but little stuff) ­ long run: everything can change (firms can vary inputs, adapt new technology) ­ total cost: cost of everything a firm uses in production ­variable costs: costs that change as output changes ­fixed costs­ remain constant as output changes TC= FC+ VC Falling Crop Prices May be a Harvest for Retail ­ corn, cotton and wheat prices expected to decrease due to higher yield, increase in  amount of crop land ­ hopefully lowers prices…lower prices in the supermarket, offset of transportation  costs Obama on Outsourcing ­ technology changes in the cost of production mean that we can make things  cheaper here in the US ­ its actually more expensive to do business in China; more jobs are coming back to  the US ­ we compete with better products, not cheaper ones! ­ Obama wants to change tax cods in a way that companies have incentives to bring  jobs here rather than outsource them • technology­ processes a firm uses to turn inputs into outputs of goods/services • technological change­ change in the ability of a firm to produce goods From China, the Future of Fish ­ demand for tilapia has risen (tofu of fish, can be cooked in anything to taste like  it). We import 80% of fish from China ­ issues= must have clean water as habitat or else will taste bad; causes  environmental issues ­ farmers abandon their farms in China due to US demand of tilapia ­ cost of producing the fish is also up (fixed, like land), labor and raw material  (variable) ­ from walmart and other buyers comes pressure to have low prices despite rising  cost of production; farmers are losing out! Operating at a loss. ­ To combat this: farmers are giving the fish food with Omega­3, a nutrient it lacks,  shipping fish. They hope this will allow them to raise prices (bigger fish, healthier  fish, trying to save more). ­ SINCE THEY CANT CHANGE THE FIXED COSTS, THEYRE TRYING TO  CHANGE THE VARIABLE ONES Fixed Costs in the Publishing Industry ­eBooks= a huge problem for the industry; cheaper, so less income for everybody  involved in production of books  •as a result, publishers are taking less contracts and signing less authors ­some conflict between authors and publishers; publishers make more of what they used  to than authors do E­Book Royalty Math: House Always Wins ­publishers have bigger profit margin on e­books than authors do; not as many costs of  sale ­ authors get the short end of the stick; author’s e­loss is publisher’s e­gain (good for  publishers because not as many production costs, bad for authors because books reap  more profit) ­ market will eventually force publishers to share e­Book gains (new publishers have to  be fairer to attract business) •explicit cost­ cost that involves spending money (supplies, etc) • implicit cost­ a non­monetary opportunity cost • production function­ curve showing relationship between inputs and  outputs RELATIONSHIP B/W PRODUCTION AND COST • average total cost: _total cost divided by quantity of output produced •Law of Diminishing Returns: at some point, adding more variable inputs to the  same amount of fixed inputs will cause marginal product of that variable input to  decline •average product of labor: total output of a firm divided by number of workers;  shows how productive each worker is   Warren Buffet on the Productivity of Workers ­ even though there is high unemployment, productivity itself is up (tech. change  and becoming more efficient) •marginal cost: additional cost to a firm of producing one more unit of a product • long­run average cost: curve showing the lowest cost at which a firm is able to  produce a given quantity output in the long run • economies of scale: firm’s long­run average costs fall as it increase output •constant return to scale: costs don’t change as you change output. Output  changing to proportional amount •minimum efficient scale­ level of output at which all economies of scale are  exhausted (no additional profit from producing additional unit) • diseconomies of scale: long­run average costs increase as firm increases output GM Plant Closes ­ firm thinks moving will increase profit; fundamental question, do we move or  stay? The Guys Who Trade Your Blood for Profit ­ General Blood, company that trades and sells blood donated to hospitals (they  think the usual supply chain system of blood distribution is a waste; its not  efficient, so blood was spoiling on hospital shelves. ­ Instead, we should FedEx blood from hospitals with a surplus to those with a  shortage ­ Interested in online marketplace to allow hospitals and individuals to choose  (basically, and eBay for blood) Econ in the News: Week 7 Four market structures Market Name Number of  Type of product Ease of entry Examples firms Perfect  Many Identical High (easy) Growing wheat  Competitive  and apples Market Monopolistic  Many Diffrentiated High (easy) Clothing stores  Competitive  and restaraunts Market Oligopoly Few Identical/slightly  Low (difficult) Manufacturing  differentiated computers,  automobiles Monopoly One Unique Entry blocked Mail delivery The Creative Monopoly ­ Peter Thiel, founder of PayPal, thinks that instead of focusing on competition one  company should dominate new market and just be awesome and unique (creative  monopoly) ­ Do this by creating a product unlike any other; a “niche”, something so creative  that you establish a distinct market. You create a demand for a product people  didn’t even know they needed (iPads, high fashion) •monopolistic v. perfect competitive: in perfect competitive, in long­run equilibrium  firms earn zero economic profit. However, monopolistic competitive firms charge a price  greater than marginal cost. They aren’t limited to market price like perfect competitive  markets are, and do not produce at minimum average total cost IS MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION EFFICIENT? • consumers benefit from being able to purchase a product that is differentiated and most  closely suited to their taste Is Google a Monopoly? ­ it got smart, bundled into browsers (search engine built into internet explorer) ­ some believe Google needs to be stopped (EU has launched a probe into Google) ­ Jeffrey Katz­ as a dominant company, Google is obligated to be transparent with  fair procedures, we need access and a fair playing field NOD TO JOURNALISTIC HISTORY: ­ Ida Tarbell’s story of Standard Oil Company in McClure’s magazine attacks  Rockefeller, 1901. Ignited public outrage, reform movements, and triggered court  action that broke up monopolies of the day ­ Does a company become so dominant that it becomes harmful? This is why you  see companies trying to be “good citizens” (willing to partner with others, be  benevolent) to avoid government intervention ­ Necessary monopolies: in items such as utilities so that government might  intervene and try and help consumers Oligopolies: very few companies. Small number of interdependent firms  (pharmaceuticals, oil) Why: •ownership of one key input: production of a good requires a particular input;  control of that input can be a barrier to entry •government­imposed barriers: ­patent: exclusive right to a product for 20 years from the date invented NY Times: Are Big Banks a Cartel? ­contends that despite crisis of 2008,  cartel of megabanks still hinders economic  recovery; these institutions remain too big to fail ­biggest banks in the US just got bigger; problem­ centralizes all power into the hands of  not many firms…whole system goes down when one firm has a problem ­big banks make risky bets, crush economy, but get rewarded ­Dodd­Frank legislation: attacks banks and their ability to not take advantage of you USING GAME THEORY TO ANALYZE OLIGOPOLY ­game theory= how people act in competition with each other for their own self interest  (study of firms in industries where the profits of each firm depend on its interactions with  other firms) •three cha
More Less

Related notes for ECONOM 1051

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit