Class Notes (835,073)
United States (324,028)
Economics (72)
George (12)
Lecture

Econ in the news 7

3 Pages
50 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECONOM 1051
Professor
George
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 11: Earthquakes I. What is an earthquake? A. vibration of the Earth produced by the rapid release of energy from rocks  that rupture because they have been subjected to stress that exceeds their  strength 1. energy released radiates in all directions from its source, the focus and  energy waves propagate through the earth in the form of seismic  (elastic) waves 2. sensitive instruments called seismometers record the event B. usually caused by sudden movements on faults; don’t happen at the  surface of the earth because there’s not enough pressure. Less frequently,  due to fractures on the ground, explosions etc. Large earthquakes usually  leave some type of scar in center of earth (faults) II. Basic Terminology A. focus­ point where earthquake initiates (hypocenter). 3D location­ latitude,  longitude, depth B. epicenter­ point on the earth’s surface directly above the epicenter as  energy travels away from the focus, it gets larger and larger and less  intense (called wave fronts). Epicenter is not superimposed on the fault at  surface; instead, its above the focus at depth C. fault scarp­ break in fault (cliff) in relief, happens when they displace and  break earth’s surface III. How faults generate earthquakes A. elastic rebound­ mechanism for earthquakes was first explained by HF  Reed. Rocks on bot sides of an existing fault are deformed by tectonic  forces; rocks bend and store elastic energy; frictional resistance holding  rocks together is overcome. Earthquake occurs when stored stress exceeds  strength of the fault B. earthquake mechanism­ slippage at the weakest point (focus) occurs.  Vibrations (earthquakes) occur as the deformed rock “springs back” to its  original shape. Earthquakes most often occur along existing faults  whenever the frictional focus on the fault surfaces are overcome IV. Foreshocks and Aftershocks A. adjustments that follow a major earthquake often generates smaller  earthquakes called aftershocks B. small earthquakes, called foreshocks often precede a major earthquake by  days, or in some cases, by years. Earthquakes never happen in isolation V. Seismology A. seismology­ study of earthquake waves B. seismographs­ instruments recording seismic waves. Record movement of  earth in relation to a stationary mass on a rotating drum or magnetic tape.  VI. Seismic Waves A. Body waves­ travel through earth’s interior 1. P­ waves­ push­pull (compress and expand) by changing volume of  intervening material. Faster velocity than S­waves. Travel through  solid, liquid and gas.  Longitudinal.  2. S­waves­ shear motion at right angles to their direction of travel.  Travel only through solids. Transverse (slower). B. Surface waves­ cause the most damage due to undulations in ground  (structural damage) 1. Rayleigh waves 2. Love waves VII. Locating Earthquakes­ further we are from epicenter, longer lag time between  P and S waves.  •locating the source of 
More Less

Related notes for ECONOM 1051

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit