Class Notes (838,376)
United States (325,376)
History (107)
HIST 1200 (33)
Ervin (7)
Lecture

History Ch 22 GML 3rd edition vol 2.docx

11 Pages
96 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 1200
Professor
Ervin
Semester
Spring

Description
History Ch 22: Fighting for the Four Freedoms: World War II, 1941­1945 03/17/2014 Fighting World War II Good Neighbors FDR’s foreign policy different than predecessors’ (encourages trade, repudiates right to intervene militarily  in Latin America) Soviet Union Latin America Good Neighbor Policy (Roosevelt’s repudiation of right to intervene with military force in internal affairs of  Latin America, repeal of Platt Amendment) The Road to War By the mid­1930s, Japan expanded its reach in Manchuria, Nanjing Hitler’s Germany campaigned to control Europe (violates Versailles Treaty) Mussolini (Italy) invaded Ethiopia Roosevelt tied to the policy of “appeasement” Growing more alarmed, but only called for quarantine of aggressors (following lead of Britain and France,  hoping that agreeing to Hitler’s demands would prevent war) U.S. Isolationism Threat seemed distant Businesspeople wished to maintain access to markets in Germany and Japan Legacy of WWI Pacifism Small town America, College campuses, those who oppose war on philosophical basis Congress: Neutrality Acts (starting in 1935 in which they ban travel on nations engaging in conflict and  banning arms shipments to warring nations) Toward Intervention 1940, Congress: “cash and carry” Agrees to sell arms to Britain (Britain pays cash for arms) 1940, Roosevelt ran for and won a third term By 1941, US closer to engaging in this conflict FDR: America, the “great arsenal of democracy” Congress passed the Lend­Lease Act Allowed military aid to countries who promised to pay it after the war Pearl Harbor On December 7, 1941 2,000 American servicemen killed, aircraft & naval vessels destroyed or damaged First attack by a foreign power on American soil since the war of 1812 FDR: Dec. 7, “a date which will live in infamy” FDR asked for a declaration of war against Japan Jeannette Rankin, the one vote against war Next day, Germany declares war on America The War in Europe D­Day (June 6, 1944) Fight in Europe begins Nearly 200,000 American/British/Canadian soldiers led by Dwight D. Eisenhower invaded Normandy in  northeast France. On the eastern front, fighting between Germany and the Soviet Union Stalingrad marked the turning point with German troops forced to surrender in January 1943 Millions of lives lost Holocaust The Home Front Mobilizing for War World War II and national government War Production Board, War Manpower Commission, Office of Price Administration Number of federal workers from 1 million to 4 million Unemployment rate from 14% to 2% (1940­43) WWII is what lifted the nation out of the great depression Income begins to be taxed at this time Government built housing for war workers and forced industries to produce for the war Business and the War Americans produced an astonishing amount of wartime goods Wartime technology West Coast emerged Nearly 2 million Americans moved to California for jobs The South remained very poor Labor in Wartime Organized labor—government­business relationship increased union membership Unions became firmly established in many economic sectors New Deal continued its descent Congress­conservative alliance kept SSA but ended WPA and CCC Fighting for the Four Freedoms The Good War FDR connected the Four Freedoms to deeply held American values “Freedom from want” Roosevelt initially meant removal of barriers to international trade Came to mean protecting the “standard of living of the American worker and farmer” after the war The Office of War Information (OWI) Established in 1942 to foster public support for the war Liberal OWI staff presented the war as the “people’s fight for freedom” against fascists Critics charged FDR with promoting New Deal social programs The Fifth Freedom Free enterprise (capitalism itself) What’s happening in private advertising firms that are also involved in molding public opinion (buy war  bonds, engage in patriotic actions) Women at War In 1944, women made up over one­third of the civilian labor force 350,000 women served in auxiliary military units Filled jobs previously closed to them New opportunities opened for married women and mothers Women at work Women’s work during the war viewed as temporary Advertisers’ ”world of tomorrow” rested on a vision of family­centered prosperity Visions of Postwar Freedom Toward an American Century Henry Luce, 1941 book The American Century America should become dominant world power, looked at for inspiration, free economic enterprise above all Henry Wallace, “The Price of Free World Victory” Challenging Henry Luce, Liberal new dealer, FDR’s vice president beginning in 1940, pushes for century of  the common man, notion that postwar vision should be about establishing a global new deal which secures  basic rights for average, ord
More Less

Related notes for HIST 1200

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit