Class Notes (834,656)
United States (323,846)
History (107)
HIST 1200 (33)
Ervin (7)
Lecture

History Ch 23 GML third edition vol 2.docx

13 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 1200
Professor
Ervin
Semester
Spring

Description
History Ch 23: The United States and the Cold War, 1945­1953 03/31/2014 The Takeaway The Cold War transformed freedom by imbuing it with anti­communism, “free enterprise,” and support for  the existing state of affairs regarding social, political, and economic matters. Tremendous impact on how Americans understood what it meant to be free and an American citizen Red Menace Video Anti­communism How Hollywood is embracing the push to produce anti­communist films and propaganda Origins of the Cold War The Two Powers: the Quest to Reshape the World in Their Own Image U.S. emerged as world’s greatest power post­WWII Largest navy and air force Only atomic bomb in the world Soviet Union Occupied eastern Europe and eastern Germany Claimed that communism modernized Russia Appealed to colonized peoples Those under authority of British and French rule are intrigued by communism and the Soviet Union’s  approach  The Roots of Containment U.S./Soviet Union alliance shared common war aim, not common interests and values Conflict between the two likely Long Telegram, George Kennan Policy of Containment Holds that the Soviet Union is aggressive by virtue of it adhering to communistic doctrine, so there needs to  be a prevention by the United States to stop this influence US aims to check ALL attempts to expand Soviet Unions power across world Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” speech Fulton, MO There is an Iron Curtain that divides the free West from the communist East. The Post WWII era would  revolve around this particular wall.  This would set US foreign policy for many decades to come The Truman Doctrine… Implemented containment policy Used powerful rhetoric: defense of freedom Helps to mobilize people in all sectors of society Suggested that U.S. had permanent global responsibility to assist anticommunist regimes around the world Was followed by new national security bodies Atomic Energy Commission – Future uses of atomic bomb National Security Council (NSC) Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) – conduct secretive military operations abroad Global Reconstruction: The Marshall Plan Secretary of State, George Marshall U.S. to give billions of dollars to finance European recovery Put a positive spin on containment policy, freedom not only about anti­communism Not just against something, but FOR something Sort of like a New Deal for Europe Among the most successful foreign aid programs GATT: General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs Help develop free trade for the United States and open up international markets and make free trade an  important reality “Our policy is directed not against any country or doctrine, but against hunger, poverty, desperation, and  chaos” Secretary of State George C. Marshall, June 1947 Global Reconstruction: Japan’s Recovery General Douglas MacArthur Japan adopted a democratic constitution Women right to vote Japan to give up war policy U.S. oversaw the successful economic reconstruction of Japan By the 1950s, economy of Japan doing rather well and booming The Berlin Blockade and the Intensification of the Cold War 1948, the Soviets cut off road and rail traffic from America, British, and French zones of occupied Germany  to Berlin 11­month Berlin aircraft May 1948, Stalin lifted blockade East and West Germany 1949, the Soviet Union tested its first atomic bomb The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), 1949 United States, Canada, Western European Nations Would together defend against Soviet attack Soviets formed Warsaw Pact, an eastern European alliance, in 1955. Their version of NATO Escalation happening, people are preparing for potential war The Growing Communist Challenge 1949, Communists won the civil war in China National Security Council: NSC­68 Approved permanent military armament Created dramatic increase in military spending Depicted the Cold War as conflict between “the idea of freedom” and “the idea of slavery” The Korean War June 1950, communist North Korea invaded anti­communist and undemocratic South Korea American troops did most of the fighting General Douglas MacArthur Ended in 1953 with little change Cold War began in Europe, but became a global conflict Cold War Critics Some criticized casting the Cold War in terms of a worldwide battle between freedom and slavery Walter Lippmann Powerful voice against language of Cold War Saw this setting up the US in very problematic ways, the US could potentially enter conflict in ideological  terms, not in a case by case basis. This could lead US in permanent war for who knows how long. Wanted US to deal with countries as they existed and not be led by ideology (slavery v. freedom) Imperialism and Decolonization Movements for colonial independence used the American Declaration of Independence Sovereignty?  Still on the table US granted independence to the Philippines in 1946 The Free World Could include repressive governments as long as they were anti­communist—South Africa. The Cold War and the Idea of Freedom: An Ideological Conflict The Cultural Cold War Cold War as a battle for the “hearts and minds” of people throughout the world American history: American creed (revolving around or valuing equality,
More Less

Related notes for HIST 1200

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit