Class Notes (836,517)
United States (324,533)
Music (68)
MUSC 1116 (8)
Lecture

Session 4 Notes.docx

5 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Music
Course
MUSC 1116
Professor
Brian Robison
Semester
Spring

Description
Session 4 Notes: Piano music along the “new way”: the “Pathetique” sonata  • Political Situation • Economy of music­making: the shift from private to commercial concerts o Aristocrats’ passion for music furnished a way of competing for prestige o Hired companies of musicians for special events o Public concerts became popular in 1790s and were put in the halls of Augarten  and Mehlgrube • Beethoven’s interactions with his patrons and his teachers in Vienna • Piano Sonata in C minor op. 13 (Pathetique) • Teachers o Franz Joseph Haydn  Different from Beethoven in terms of never rebelling against the  Nobility. He had personal allegiance to his patrons since they were so  generous with him  Beethoven’s stubborn personal resistance troubled his relationship  with Haydn. Haydn still did what he could to further Beethoven’s  development  Beethoven really respected Haydn on the highest level of musical  grounds and always needed his blessing. On the personal level, their  relationship was not easy since Beethoven was so sensitive.  Beethoven was getting nowhere with Haydn’s counterpoint studies  Beethoven's relationship with Joseph Haydn was characterized by (a)  ruffled feelings as Haydn criticized Beethoven's music, and the latter  interpreted this as a sign of jealousy, (b) artistic reverence for Haydn's  mastery of music, and (c) strong differences in social, political, and  intellectual outlook o Johann Schenk (decent journeyman composer)  So, Beethoven started studying with Schenk. Schenk worked hard at  correcting Beethoven’s counterpoint exercises   Schenk insisted for this arrangement to be kept secret from Haydn o Johann Georg Albrechtsberger  Then, Beethoven took lessons from Albrechtsberger for further  counterpoint lessons (with or w/o Haydn’s knowledge)  Albrechtsberger had great conscientiousness and care in details   Beethoven composed among the purest compositions after these  lessons o Beethoven found it difficult to credit generously his composition teachers, (a)  Antonio Salieri, (b) Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, and (c) Franz Joseph  Haydn • Patrons o Beethoven had many patrons (about 30) in Vienna o Beethoven’s attitude towards his patrons fluctuated between burning ambition  to succeed and also independence as a musician. He also had ill­concealed  anger at them, himself, and his need to accept their largesse while struggling  to free himself from servitude.  o Demanded respect and had violent temper tantrums. Didn’t dress very nice  either (common clothing) o The Nobility knew they were living on borrowed time since their own country  was signaling dangers in their sheltered statuses o Looked for way to put meaning into their lives (hunting, balls, receptions,  gossip, affairs, etc) o Prince Karl LICHNOWSKY:   Very generous and gave Beethoven 600 florin per year from 1801­ 1806.   Also was close to Mozart and arranged the same tour for Beethoven as  he did for Mozart.  The Prince was a well­trained musician who played during the day and  pursued women by night.  Fathered many illegitimate children and died of venereal disease o Princess Christiane LICHNOWSKY  Endured a painful marriage o Prince Franz Joseph Maximilian von LOBKOWITZ • Composing
More Less

Related notes for MUSC 1116

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit