Class Notes (836,135)
United States (324,357)
Psychology (395)
PSYC 3400 (29)
Lecture 3

Lecture 3 Individual Psychology

4 Pages
121 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 3400
Professor
William Sharp
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 3 Adler: Individual Psychology • Alfred Adler • Born: February 7, 1870 – Rudolfsheim, Austria • As child, weak and sickly – Nearly died of pneumonia • Younger brother died – Found him in the bed next to his – Saw it as a challenge to overcome death • Siblings and peers played pivotal role • Obtained medical degree in 1895 – First eye specialist, then psychiatry and general medicine • Striving for Success or Superiority • People are born with weak and inferior bodies – Leads to feelings of inferiority and dependence • Striving for success or superiority becomes dynamic force and motivation – Psychologically unhealthy: strive for personal superiority – Psychologically healthy: strive for success for all humanity • The Final Goal • Fictional • Product of creative power – People’s ability to freely shape their behavior and create their own  personality – If children are neglected or pampered, goal remains unconscious – If children experience love and security, set a goal that is conscious • Strive toward superiority in terms of success and social interest • The Striving Force as Compensation • Compensate for feelings of inferiority • Without the innate movement toward perfection, would not feel inferior • Without feelings of inferiority, would not set a goal of superiority • Must develop strive for success – Starts at age 4 or 5 – Success is individual • Striving for Personal Superiority • No concern for others • Motivated by exaggerated feelings of personal inferiority • Striving for Success • Help others without expecting reward • Own success is to move toward completion or perfection • See problems from view of society • Sense of personal worth tied to contributions to human society • Social progress more important than personal credit • Subjective Perceptions • People’s subjective perceptions shape their behavior and personality • Fictionalism – Ideas that have no real existence but influence people as if they really  existed. – Motivated not by what is true but what we think is true [Type text] [Type text] [Type text] • Physical Inferiorities – Physical deficiencies provide motivation for reaching future goals • Unity and Self­Consistency of Personality • Personality is unified and self­consistent • Thoughts, feelings, and actions are all directed toward a single goal and serve a  single purpose • Organ Dialect – The expression of a person’s underlying intentions or style of life through  a diseased or dysfunctional bodily organ. • Conscious and Unconscious – Cooperating parts of the same system – Unconscious thoughts are not helpful – Social Interest • The value of all human activity must be seen from the viewpoint of social interest • A feeling of oneness with all humanity • Membership in the social community • An attitude of relatedness with humanity in general, as well as an empathy for  each member of the community • Natural inferiority necessitates joining together • Origins of Social Interest • Originates from mother­child relationship • Mother’s job is to develop a bond that encourages child’s mature social interest • Father must demonstrate caring attitude toward wife and others and cooperate in  caring for child – If father is detached, result in feeling of neglect and parasitic relationship  with mother – If father is authoritarian, result in strive for power and personal superiority • Style of Life • The self­consistent personality structure develops into a person’s style of life • Consists of one’s goal, self­concept, feelings for others, and attitude towards  world
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 3400

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit