Class Notes (839,394)
United States (325,937)
Economics (79)
All (13)
Lecture

Chapter 10 Notes

3 Pages
75 Views

Department
Economics
Course Code
ECON 2001.01
Professor
All

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Description
Chapter 10 • Curves that show the relationship between the level of output and per­unit cost are  called average total cost curves • 10.1 ­Technology: the process a firm uses to turn inputs into outputs of goods and  services ­Technological change: A change in the ability of a firm to produce a given level  of output with a given quantity of inputs Positive ex. (rearranging a retail store layout in order to increase production and  sales) Negative ex. (hiring less skilled workers) ­Inventories: good that have been produced but not yet sold ­Turn over: to sell them ­Stockouts: sales lost because the good consumers want to buy are not on the  shelves ­Just­in­time inventory systems: firms accept shipments from suppliers as close as  possible to the time they will be needed ­Supply Chain: stretches from manufacturers of goods it sells to its retail stores 10.2 ­Short run: The period of time during which at least one of a firm’s inputs are  fixed ­Long run: the period of time in which a firm can vary all its inputs, adopt new  technology, and increase or decrease the size of its physical plant ­Long run is a transitional period, so production is only counted in the short run ­Total cost: the cost of all inputs a firm uses in production ­Variable costs: costs that change as output changes (Production jobs, labor costs, raw material costs, and costs of electricity and other  utilities) ­Fixed costs: costs that remain constant as output changes (Secretary jobs, lease payments for factory or retail space, payments for fire  insurance, and payments for newspaper and television advertising) Total cost=Fixed cost + Variable cost ­Opportunity cost: The highest­valued alternative that must be given up in order  to engage in an activity ­Explicit cost (accounting cost): A cost that involves spending money ­Implicit cost: A nonmonetary opportunity cost ­Economic deprecation: difference between what you pay for capital at beginning  of year and what it is worth at end of year ­Production function: relationship between the inputs employed by a firm and the  maximum output it could produce with those inputs ­Average total cost: total cost divided by the quantity of output produced 10.3 ­Marginal product of labor: the additional output a firm produces as a result of  hiring one more worker ­Increase in marginal product results from the division of labor and from  specialization ­By dividing the tasks the tasks that need to be preformed (division of labor) we  allow workers to become more specialized at their tasks (increases efficiency) ­Law of diminishing returns: the principle that, at some point, adding more of a  variable input, such as labor, to the same amount of a fixed input, such as capital,  will cause the marginal product of the variable input to decline ­As we hire more workers, the marginal product of labor eventually begins to  decline  ­ Ex. If we keep hiring more and more workers, eventually they will get in one  another’s way, and marginal produ
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit