Class Notes (839,475)
United States (325,993)
Economics (79)
All (13)
Lecture

Chapter 11 Notes

4 Pages
34 Views

Department
Economics
Course Code
ECON 2001.01
Professor
All

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Description
Chapter 11 Notes Firms in perfectly competitive markets Intro ­If people see an economic opportunity, usually it only lasts for a  few years ­Throughout the economy, entrepreneurs are continually  introducing new products, which­when successful­enable them to  earn economic profits in the short run. But in the long run,  competition among firms forces prices to the level where they just  cover the costs of production.  ­Firms in perfectly competitive industries are unable to control the  prices of the products they sell and are unable to earn an economic  profit in the long run because they have identical products and it is  easy for new firms to enter these industries ­Any industry has 3 key characteristics 1. # Of firms in industry 2.  Similarity of G or S produced by the firms in the industry 3. The  ease at which new firms can enter the industry ­4 market structures: Perfect Competition ex. Growing apples,  Monopolistic Competition (different products) ex. Clothing stores,  oligopoly (few firms) ex. Automobile manufacturers, monopoly  (one firm, unique product) ex. First class mail 11.1 ­Perfectly Competitive Market: A market that meets the conditions  of 1. Many buyers and sellers, 2. All firms selling identical  products, 3. No barriers to new firms entering the market ­ The existence of many firms keeps any single firm from effecting  the price of a good ­Consumers and firms have to accept the market price if they want  to buy or sell in a perfectly competitive market ­Price Taker: A buyer or seller that is unable to effect the market  price ­If any one wheat farmer has the best crop the farmer has ever had,  or if any one wheat farmer stops growing wheat all together, the  market price of wheat will not be affected because the market  supply curve for wheat will not shift by enough to change the  equilibrium price by even one cent ­The demand curve for a perfectly competitive firm is horizontal 11.2 ­Profit: Total revenue minus total cost ­Average Revenue: Total revenue divided by the quantity of the  product sold ­Total Revenue = PxQ and Average Revenue = TR/Q (AR=P) ­Marginal Revenue: The change in total revenue from selling one  more unit of a product ­MR=Change in total revenue/Change in quantity ­For a firm to be in a perfectly competitive market, price is equal to  both average revenue and marginal revenue ­The marginal revenue curve for a perfectly competitive firm is the  same as the demand curve ­Optimal decisions are made AT THE MARGIN ­The profit maximizing lev
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit