Class Notes (834,026)
United States (323,604)
Economics (76)
All (13)
Lecture

Chapter 14 Notes

3 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 2001.01
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 14 Notes Monopoly and Antitrust Policy INTRO ­It is very difficult to remain a monopoly because whenever a firm  earns economic profit, other firms will enter its markets ­Even though perfectly competitive markets are rare, this market  model provides a benchmark for how a firm acts in the most  competitive situation possible ­The monopoly model is the other extreme (no competition) and is  useful in analyzing situations in which firms agree to collude or  work together as if they were a monopoly 14.1 ­Monopoly: A firm that is the only seller of a good or service that  does not have a close substitute ­A firm has a monopoly if it can ignore the actions of all other  firms ­in a broader sense, a monopoly is any company whose economic  profits cannot be competed away (the only pizza parlor in town  still has close substitutes ie mcdonalds, but they don’t take away to  the point where the pizza parlor would lose money) 14.2 ­In order to have a monopoly, barriers to entry must be very high! ­they can be high for four main reasons 1. A government blocks  entry of more than one firm into a market (by patent/copyright or  public franchise) 2. One firm has control of a key resource  necessary to produce a good 3. There are important network  externalities in supplying the good or service 4. Economies of  scale are so large that one firm has a natural monopoly ­generic drugs can be produced only after the patent of the original  drug is up ­Most economic profits from selling a drug are eliminated 20 years  after the drug is first offered for sale ­Copyright: A government­granted exclusive right to produce and  sell a creation (70 years) ­Public franchise: A government designation that a firm is the only  legal provider of a good or service ­Network externalities: A situation in which the usefulness of a  product increases with the number of consumers who use it ­Network externalities create a virtuous cycle: if a firm products  value has been increased by more people using it, it can attract  additional consumers, and so on ­Economies of scale: when a firms long run average costs fall as it  increases the quantity of output it produces  ­Natural Monopoly: A situation in which economies of scale are so 
More Less

Related notes for ECON 2001.01

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit