Class Notes (836,148)
United States (324,358)
History (38)
HIST 1191 (12)
Lecture 7

Lecture 7: 10/9/13

3 Pages
49 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 1191
Professor
Janelle Greenberg
Semester
Fall

Description
HIST 1191 notes – Lecture 7 (10/9/13) – page 1 The Legal Status of the English Woman in Early Eighteenth­Century Common Law and  Equity • Doctrine of Coverture o A married woman is covert and one in law with her husband • Dower estate =/= dowry o In marriage, the land the husband takes with him to the marriage is a  dower estate  Wife holds it as a life estate  If he dies, the land is still there to provide for his family  She is seised of the dower estate as a life estate, but he controls it  until he dies (if he dies)  If he sells it, she can purchase a writ of dower and get it back after  he's dead o Purpose of dower estate is to preserve the family line and take care of  husband if she dies • Courtesy estate o An estate that the wife brings to the marriage that becomes the husband's  only upon live birth of a child who will inherit and who was "heard to cry  within the four walls" o Husband's right in wife's land that she brings to the marriage is his  courtesy estate o Only upon birth of child who will inherit the land  She does not have to die • Parent can give daughter fee tail female when she goes into marriage ­ will be  inherited by a woman • In cities, femme coverts can claim to be unmarried in London courts so they can  own businesses • Woman have numerical literacy, are bookkeepers  • Court of King's Bench o Cases that most concern the king o Any case concerning a great noble family, one of his children, royal lands,  etc. o Can deal with criminal matters • Court of Common Pleas  o Hears other kinds of cases that the king doesn't care a whole lot about o Often land dispute cases o Can deal with criminal matters • Exchequer Chamber o Another court in which king is interested o Consists of several justices from Common Pleas and King's Bench o If someone owes a debt to the king that they haven't paid, they are sent to  Court of Exchequer • Courts do not yet have monopoly over certain areas ­ not until 16th century • All courts exist due to king's duty to do justice by his people o Establishing all these courts d/n exhaust his judicial power; still holds his  own place in judiciary above all • Begins with centralization of justice o HII's reforms pull an increasing amount of cases into the king's hands  Civil (land) & criminal cases o At first, king likely listened to cases personally (HI) • Beginning with HI, kings began to delegate hearing of cases to trusted men o 12­18 itinerant justices "on eyre" included (from AoC)  Beginning of nascent judiciary o King legally present when royal justice is present • Court of Chancery o Writing division of government
More Less

Related notes for HIST 1191

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit