Class Notes (834,384)
United States (323,745)
History (38)
HIST 1191 (12)
Lecture 8

Lecture 8: 10/16/13

4 Pages
25 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 1191
Professor
Janelle Greenberg
Semester
Fall

Description
HIST 1191 notes – Lecture 8 (10/16/13) – page 1 Kings, Parliaments, and Law The Medieval Period Historical context of Magna Carta • Was a failure o Meant as peace treaty between King John and his barons, but provoked  another war • Pretended to state customary law o Introduced new customs o Bound the king in new ways • Legally valid for no more than three months ­ June­August 1215 o Within time period, its terms were never fully executed • Magna Carta revived 1216 after King John's death o HIII succeeds at age 9 in 1216 ­ barons rule in his place unofficially  Barons make him confirm MC in 1216 and 1217 o Revised 1217, 1225 ­ during reign of HIII  Gets rid of some of the chapters from the original, chapters  renumbered • 1225: another revision of 1215 MC o HIII now of age, confirms MC again o IMPORTANT because   It will become the official MC and first statute in the official  Statutes of the Realm  Brought to US by 17th century colonists • MA Bay Colony uses parts of MC in their  charter/constitution  Jefferson, Franklin, etc. (Framers) have in their libraries • Despite original failure, MC had great staying power • Theory of kingship in place: king is absolute ruler imbued with divinity o King granted power by God and God's representative on earth ­ Pope ­  same level as king o Enjoys royal prerogatives that enable him to ignore/act outside of  (positive/man­made) law of the land  "the king can do no wrong"  Royal prerogatives: • Dispensing and suspending powers (frequently done by  King John) o To say that king has right to make laws by himself does not necessarily  mean that he does  Kings call men that they trust, create royal council, consult with  them  Despite their advice, the statute that he makes is made by his  authority alone • HII's writs, AoC created by him, but mention other people • Kings were not powerless, but they did have limitations • Cannot sue, bring writ against, fight king ­ that's rebellion against king and against  God o Only time subjects can resist king with arms: if he tries to destroy entire  kingdom  Also true for pope o Locke: act against and look to Heaven to figure out if it's justified  Also: win/lose just/unjust, respectively • Medieval absolutism limited by divine law, law of nature • King John = an absolute ruler, not a constitutional monarch • Institutional legitimized with baron­friendly ideas ­ feudalism o King sits at apex of feudal tenure ladder  (Well, King John gives England to the Pope as fief, but that's an  aberration, not the norm) o Feudalism has the concept of reciprocity/mutuality ­ applies to all on  ladder of tenure, regardless of status  Theory upon which the barons base their resistance • Barons argue that John has broken feudal customs o John has problems on three fronts  Papacy • Typical problem • John wants to appoint his own bishops • John appoints bishop, Pope appoints another bishop ­ Pope  wins • Bishop ­ Stephen Langton ­ archbishop of Canterbury  o Instrumental in creation of MC 
More Less

Related notes for HIST 1191

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit