Class Notes (835,872)
United States (324,281)
01:119:115 (825)
A L L (20)
Lecture

GENERAL BIOLOGY Notes (Part 8) - 4.0ed the course!

8 Pages
94 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences
Course
01:119:115
Professor
A L L
Semester
Fall

Description
Gene regulation 10/29/2013 How do cells “know” what genes should be expressed (i.e. transcribed and translated) and when? Bacteria Changes in environmental conditions can alter expression of genes that facilitate their survival Natural selection have favored bacteria that produce only the products needed by that cell A cell can regulate the production of enzymes by feedback inhibition or gene regulation For example, tryptophan is amino acid needed by E. coli to survive Figure 18.2 Operon model – basic mechanism for the control of gene expression in bacteria Discovered in 1961 by Jacob & Monod Describes the coordinated expression of a group of genes by a single “on­off” switch The regulatory “switch” is a segment of DNA called an operator Operator positioned within the promoter region + controls access of RNA polymerase to genes clustered  together Operon – entire stretch of DNA including operator, promoter, + genes they control Operon can be switched “off” by a protein repressor Repressor prevents gene transcription by binding to the operator + blocking RNA polymerase Repressor is a product of a separate regulatory gene Repressor can be in active or inactive form (depending on presence of other molecules) Corepressor – molecules that cooperates w/ a repressor protein to switch operon “off” Example: synthesis of tryptophan by E. coli trp operon controls 5 genes that code for 3 enzymes needed to produce tryptophan By default, operon is “on” and genes for tryptophan synthesis are transcribed Figure 18.3a Repressor is active only in presence of its corepressor (tryptophan) Figure 18.3b The lac operon contains genes that code for enzymes used in the hydrolysis and metabolism of lactose Lactose is a disaccharide (glucose + galactose), found in milk Hydrolysis of lactose into glucose + galactose is done by enzyme B­galactosidase B­galactosidase is controlled by gene lacZ which is part of lac operon along w/ 2 other genes By itself, the lac repressor is active and switches lac operon “off” A molecule called the inducer inactivates the repressor to turn the lac operon on Repressible operons vs inducible operons Inducible enzymes usually function in catabolic pathways; their synthesis is induced by a chemical signal Repressible enzymes usually function in anabolic pathways; their synthesis is repressed by high levels of  the end product Regulation in trp and lac operons involves negative control of genes because operons are switched “off” by  the active form of the repressor Positive gene regulation Some operons are also subject to positive control through a stimulatory protein that serves an activator of  transcription For example, catabolite activator protein (CAP) is a stimulatory protein or activator When glucose )preferred food for E. coli) is scarce, CAP is activated by binding w/ cyclic AMP (cAMP), a  small organic molecule that accumulates when glucose is low Activated CAP attaches to the promoter of the lac operon and increases the affinity of RNA polymerase,  thus accelerating transcription When glucose levels increase, CAP detaches from lac operon and transcription returns to a normal rate CAP helps regulate other operons that encode enzymes used in catabolic pathways Figure 18.5 In multicellular organisms (eukaryotes), regulation of gene expression is essential for cell specialization Almost all cells in multicellular organism are identical (i.e. have identical genome) Differences b/w cell types result from differential gene expression (expression of different genes by cells w/  same genome) When gene expression becomes abnormal, it can lead to imbalances + diseases, including cancer Gene expression can be regulated at many stages in eukaryotic cells Figure 18.6 Regulation of chromatin structure Remember that DNA in eukaryotes is packaged w/ proteins in complex called chromatin Basic unit of chromatin in nucleosome Structure of chromatin helps pack DNA + also regulate gene expression in several ways Location of a gene’s promoter relative to bath placement of nucleosomes + sites where DNA attaches to  chromosome scaffolding can affect translation Figure 16.22 Some chromatin can exist in highly condensed state during interphase Visible as irregular clumps under light microscope – heterochromatin Less compacted + more dispersed – euchromatin Genes within heterochromatin are usually not expressed Histone modification can affect chromatin structure + gene expression Histone acetylation occurs when acetyl groups [­COCH3] are attached to + charged lysines in histone tails  by modifying enzymes This loosens chromatin structure, promoting the initiation of transcription Modifying enzymes can also add methyl groups (methylation) which condensed chromatin + the addition of  phosphate groups (phosphorylation) loosens chromatin Figure 18.7 Other enzymes c
More Less

Related notes for 01:119:115

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit