Class Notes (835,539)
United States (324,181)
01:119:115 (825)
A L L (20)
Lecture

GENERAL BIOLOGY Notes (Part 13) - 4.0ed the course!

7 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences
Course
01:119:115
Professor
A L L
Semester
Fall

Description
Microevolution 11/15/2013 Sources of genetic variation in populations Formation of new alleles E.g. Get rest of notes How can we test if a population is evolving? Population All individuals of the same species that live in a particular place at the same time Individuals are capable of breeding w/ one another On average, individuals more closely related to each other than to other populations Gene pool Characterizes a population’s genetic makeup Gene pool – all the alleles for all loci present in a population Every individual has only a fraction of the alleles present in population’s gene pool Phenotype frequency Proportion of particular phenotype in a population Genotype frequency Proportion of particular genotype in a population Allele frequency Proportion of specific allele (B or b) in a population B (BB + Bb) [640+640+320] b (Bb + bb) [320+40+40] p = dominant allele q = recessive allele Ex: in humans, rolling of tongue is dominant genetic trait. Population of 1000 individuals genotyped for  ability to roll tongue. Results show 360 homozygous dominant, 480 heterozygous, and 180 homozygous  recessive. What is the frequency? p = 0.60 ; q = 0.40 Ex: silver hair color (S) in population of wild monkeys has frequency of .86 while brown hair (s) has  frequency of .14. What is the allele frequency of the next generation assuming random union of gametes  produced by parental population? SS ­ .86*.86; Ss ­ .86*.14*2; ss ­ .14*.14 Same as before Frequency of alleles + genotypes do not change from generation to generation unless influenced by outside  factors A population whose allele + genotype frequencies do not change from generation to generation is said to  be in genetic equilibrium A population at genetic equilibrium is not evolving w/ respect to the locus being studied What explanation do we have for stability of populations at genetic equilibrium (not evolving)? Hardy­Weinberg Principle Describes expected genotype frequencies in sexual reproducing population, not evolving Frequency of alleles + genotypes in population remain constant across generations Freq. constant, provided only Mendelian segregation + recombination of alleles are at work Represents ideal situation (seldom occurs in nature) Useful to think of crosses in new way as combinations in all crosses in a population Alleles are selected at random from a gene pool Figure 23.7 Hardy­Weinberg equation p + q = 1 (p + q)^2 = 1 (p + q) (p + q) = 1 p^2 + 2pq + q^2 = 1 (frequency of AA) + (frequency of Aa) + (frequency of aa) = all individuals in a population Can use phenotype frequencies to calculate genotype + allele frequency Also use genotype freq. to calculate allele frequency (vice versa) Ex: Red flowers (.6), white flowers (.4) p = .388, q = .632 p^2 = .135, 2pq = .465, q^2 =.4 Values from calculations provide basis for comparing a population’s allele or genotype frequency in  successive generations Tells us what to expect when a sexually reproducing population is not evolving
More Less

Related notes for 01:119:115

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit