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Lecture 8

01:202:201 Lecture Notes - Lecture 8: Presentence Investigation Report, Capital Punishment By Country, Mandatory Sentencing


Department
Criminal Justice
Course Code
01:202:201
Professor
Donnelly
Lecture
8

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Chapter 9: Sentencing
Sentencing is done by the courts, judicial authority (the judge), NOT corrections.
The Presentence Investigation
Presentence Investigation (PSI) - the examination of a convicted offender’s background prior
to sentencing
The presentence investigation report can take one of three forms:
A detailed written report on the defendant’s personal and criminal history
An abbreviated written report summarizing the information
A verbal report to the court
The judge has four sentencing options: prison, death, fines, and community corrections
Retribution
The act of taking revenge on a criminal perpetrator
The earliest-known rationale for punishment
Corresponds to the model of sentencing called just deserts (you got what you deserved)
Incapacitation
The use of imprisonment or other means to reduce the likelihood that an offender will
commit future offenses
Seeks to protect innocent members of society
Deterrence
General Deterrence - a goal of criminal sentencing that seeks to prevent others from
committing particular others from committing crimes similar to the one for which a particular
offender is being sentenced by making an example of the person sentenced
Overall goal is crime prevention
Specific Deterrence - a goal of criminal sentencing that seeks to prevent a particular offender
from engaging in repeat criminality
Aims to reduce the likelihood of recidivism
Rehabilitation
The attempt to reform a criminal offender, seeks to bring about fundamental changes in
offenders and their behavior
Restoration
Restoration - a goal of criminal sentencing that attempts to make the victim “whole” again
Indeterminate Sentencing
Indeterminate sentencing - a model of criminal punishment that encourages rehabilitation
through the use of general and relatively unspecific sentences
Relies heavily on judges’ discretion
Concurrent sentence - two or more sentences served at the same time, only 11 years
Consecutive sentence - served one after the other, 22 years
Gain time - amount of time deducted from prison time on a given sentence as a consequence
of participation in special projects or programs
Good time - amount of time deducted from prison time on a given sentence as a consequence
of good behavior
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