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Lecture 2

01:830:271 Lecture Notes - Lecture 2: Frontal Lobe, Constipation, Antibody


Department
Psychology
Course Code
01:830:271
Professor
L.Dickson
Lecture
2

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Do know the (incredible!) rate of growth during the first year (doubled their weight by
__3months_; tripled by_1st___)
Benefits of breastfeeding
Breast-feeding is the best way to ensure that babies get their nourishment. Human
milk contains the proper amounts of carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, and
minerals for babies.
First, breast-fed babies are ill less often because breast milk contains the mother’s
antibodies. Second, breast-fed babies are less prone to diarrhea and constipation.
Third, breast-fed babies typically make the transition to solid foods more easily,
apparently because they are accustomed to changes in the taste of breast milk that
reflect a mother’s diet.
Benefits/ potential dangers of bottle-feeding
A mother who cannot readily breast-feed can still enjoy the intimacy of feeding
her baby, and other family members can participate in feeding. Breast- and bottle-
fed babies are similar in physical and psychological development
the only water available to prepare formula is contaminated, which causes infants
to have chronic diarrhea, leading to dehydration and sometimes death. Or, in an
effort to conserve valuable formula, parents may ignore instructions and use less
formula than indicated when making milk; the resulting “weak” milk leads to
malnutrition.
How many children worldwide are malnourished (%age)?
one in four children under age 5 is malnourished,
Why isn’t the answer simply to provide access to an adequate diet?
Malnourished children are often quiet and express little interest in what goes on
around them. These behaviors are adaptive in conserving limited energy (Ricciuti,
1993) but they often deprive youngsters of experiences that would further their
development.
Know the major parts of the neuron (Fig 3.3)
What’s going on in your frontal cortex? (Fig 3.4)
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