SOC 201 Lecture 4: Memo #4

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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC 201
Professor
Rebekah Burroway

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Jennifer Gisselle Marmol
Reading Memo #4
The article, Theorizing at the Margins: Du Bois, The Scholar Denied, and the Matter of Black
Lives, categorized Du Bois as a “moral and intellectual champion” because of his efforts to
establish a systematic methodology with the intent of dismantling oppression currently aimed
towards the Black community (1). It portrayed juxtaposed views on Du Bois, for instance, it gave
the perception from scholars like Aldon Morris, who’s main incentive seemed to be to
undermine the work of Du Bois; it also his efforts made against the opposing class. It highlighted
some of Du Bois key concepts: color-line and double consciousness.
This article was critiquing Du Bois and trying to gather evidence to prove that although
his work was meant to promote black excellence and dismantle the existing idea that Blacks
were biologically and culturally inferior to whites, he did not deny these ideas. A quote from
these article that I completely disagree on comes from the historian Ibram Kendi who wrote “Du
Bois spent much of his life looking down on “low-class” blacks” (157). I don’t think of his work
as looking down on the Black community, rather I think he was a realist and noticed the pattern
already existing in society a society that deemed Blacks as inferiors.
The Souls of Black Folks was a distinctive read. It was more interpersonal and allowed
for the readers to sympathize with the Black community who were then struggling to be free, in
all aspects of the word “free”. As I mentioned in a previous reading memoir, this read depicts
the Black community who still feel oppressed and living a life that’s questionably not worth
living. A quote that touched me was the following: “in constant distrust of everything white; or
wasted itself in a bitter cry”. (89).
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Description
Jennifer Gisselle Marmol Reading Memo #4 The article, Theorizing at the Margins: Du Bois, The Scholar Denied, and the Matter of Black Lives, categorized Du Bois as a moral and intellectual champion because of his efforts to establish a systematic methodology with the intent of dismantling oppression currently aimed towards the Black community (1). It portrayed juxtaposed views on Du Bois, for instance, it gave the perception from scholars like Aldon Morris, whos main incentive seemed to be to undermine the work of Du Bois; it also his efforts made against the opposing class. It highlighted some of Du Bois key concepts: color-line and double consciousness. This article was critiquing Du Bois and trying to gather evidence to prove that although his work was meant to promote black excellence and dismantle the existing idea that Blacks were biologically and culturally inferior to whites, he d
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