Class Notes (837,610)
United States (325,107)
PHIL-119 (1)
waters (1)
Lecture

Ethics Study Guide on Socrates.docx

5 Pages
114 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL-119
Professor
waters
Semester
Fall

Description
Ethics: Study Sheet 1 Socrates’ method of philosophizing was: Dialogue, communication, talking, People had more pressure in conversation than  readers do. They were easily exposed.  Euthyphro­ who was he? What is he doing?  An expert in religion, he was a high priest. He was prosecuting his father for  killing the man who killed a man.  Euthyphro’s seven definitions of piety:  1. Pious is to do what he is doing (prosecuting his father).  2. Pious is what is dear to the gods. 3. Pious is something ALL of the gods love.  4. Pious is concerned with the care of the gods.  5. Piety is service to the gods. 6. Piety is the religious rituals (prayer and sacrifices are pious actions). Piety is  the knowledge of how to pray and offer sacrifice.  7.  Piety is pleasing the gods. Socrates’ criticism of those definitions:  1. This is an example, not a definition.  2. The gods are always in discord, having different likes/dislikes. Something  could be both pious and impious.  3. Something is pious because it is loved or loved because it is pious? It’s an  action by the gods, not a definition.  4. To care is to improve. The gods do not need improving, nor should anyone try  to improve them.  5. To serve is to help accomplish. The gods do not need help accomplishing  anything.  6. A trading service with the gods (going through religious motions).  7. What is benefitting them and what is dear to them? They do not need  benefitting  Six typical logical/rhetorical distinctions and strategies that Socrates uses in dialogue: 1. Distinguish between opposites. If you know what x is you must know the  opposite of x.  2. Distinguish between parts and wholes. Asks of something, what are its parts,  and what larger whole is it apart of?  3. Makes digressions in order to establish an analogy with the primary topic at  hand. Then returns to the primary topic.  4. Distinguish between the agent who performs an action and the action that is  performed (subject of the sentence vs. the verb).  5. Distinguish between the action performed and the object that the action is  directed onto (verb vs. object of the verb).  6. Examine the meanings of ordinary words, words which most people use but  never really think about.  Disagreements about matters of fact vs. matters of value:  People don’t get emotional about a disagreement about a measurable thing. It’s a  matter of fact. Verses an argument that is based on values and beliefs, which  people get emotional about.  Socrates’ consistency as a person:  He says he will talk the same way in court as he would outside of the courts. He  says he has a deep sense of consistency, that he is the same person in public as he  is in private.  The meaning of the title Apology:  “Apolopia” – to defend and justify oneself; the part of the trial where the  defendant would defend himself.  Sophists:  Taught rhetoric and charged for their services, meaning only who could afford it  benefited from it.  Aristophanes’ Clouds: Produced in 423 B.C. Socrates mentioned the character called Socrates. “a  Socrates swinging about there, saying that he was walking on air and talking a lot  of other nonsense about things of which I know nothing at all.” Greek trial system (and how it differs from ours today):  1. civil cases only, no criminal cases.  2. They had no lawyers in court; only individuals represent themselves. 3. Large juries­ 501 in the case of Socrates’ trial.  4. Court cases lasted one day.  5. Counter assessment phase of the trial, in which a convicted person gets to  propose his own punishment.  The two sets of “accusers” and the linkage between these two levels of accusations:  1. Several generations had spread rumors and slander against him­ that he was  dangerous or a threat to the society. Because of this, he has a negative  reputation. People who were in there 40s had grown up hearing about  Socrates’ reputation.  2. The case and the charges against him­ they wouldn’t have charged him  without knowing about his reputation.  Anaxagoras, and Socrates’ attitude toward astronomy, natural science, etc.: He claimed that the universe was directed by Nous (Mind) and that matter was  indestructible but always combining in various ways. He taught nature was  inhibited by spiritual forces (a spirit in the ocean that makes the waves, sun, etc.)  He denied the existence of gods and was put on trial and sent to exile. Socrates  never had anything to do with natural sciences. Socrates said his teachings were  not as corrupting, and Anaxagoras’ teachings were available for purchase in print  for a small price. Anaxagoras was viewed as someone who threatened the  religious society.  Socrates’ account of his life and reputation:  Though he has a bad reputation, he believes he is the gods gift to Athens. He  thinks he should have better treatment than the Olympians.  The specific charges in the deposition:  “Socrates is guilty of corrupting the young and of not believing in the gods whom 
More Less

Related notes for PHIL-119

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit