Class Notes (834,252)
United States (323,681)
Biology (196)
BIO-0013 (103)
Lecture

4, 15.1, 19.2 Class Notes.docx

3 Pages
56 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIO-0013
Professor
Michelle Gaudette
Semester
Fall

Description
October 2, 2013 Frederick Griffith (1928): there is a molecule in bacteria that gives them the ability to become  pathogenic  ▯called this the transforming molecule • Studied streptococcus pneumonia • Rough­outer strain (R strain ­ harmless) and smooth­outer strain (S strain – mice died) • Heat killed s strain doesn’t kill the mice, but heat killed s added to live r strain kills the  mice (the r strain is transformed) Avery, MacLeod, McCarty (1944): showed that this transforming molecule is DNA Alfred Hershey, Martha Chase (1952): the hereditary material in a bacterial virus is also DNA Franklin, Crick, Watson, and Wilkins proposed a structural model for double­stranded DNA  (1953): • Franklin and Wilkins used x­ray crystallography to show the structure of DNA  o Diffraction pattern – circle with an x in it  This picture was shown to Watson and Crick  They determined that the structure was most likely a double helix The DNA double helix (B­form DNA – most common in cells): • Sugar­phosphate backbone faces outwards • Nitrogenous bases face inwards • Right­handed helix • Wide major groove, narrow minor groove (how spaced out the DNA twists are) o Major groove has space for molecules to get into the base pairs for transcription • Bonds in the helix: o Hydrogen bonds between nitrogenous bases o Hydrophobic interactions between bases – base stacking excludes water between  the bases • Base pairs are not oriented in the direct middle of the helix – they are off to the side  ▯ creates the major and minor grooves Nucleotide building blocks: • Phosphate group • 5­carbon sugar o carbons are labeled with primes o RNA has ribose o DNA has deoxyribose • Nitrogenous base o Pyrimidines (one ring)  Cytosine, uracil, thymine o Purine (two rings)  Guanine  adenine • Nucleoside = sugar + base (no phosphate) 5’  ▯3’  • 3’ – hydroxyl group • 5’ – no hydroxyl bond Pyrimidines bond with purines • Adenine + Thymine • Guanine + Cytosine • Relative stability: G­C > A­T > A­U Chargaff Rules (1949): • A = T • G = C  • Purines = Pyrimidines  • A+G/C+T = 1  RNA differs from DNA in 3 aspects: • Ribose sugar  o 2’ carbon has an OH  ▯makes it highly reactive (RNA is not a very stable molecule   because of this) • Uracil instead of thymine • RNA doesn’t normally form a double­helical structure, but it can have significant 
More Less

Related notes for BIO-0013

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit