Class Notes (835,006)
United States (324,008)
CD-0068 (19)
Lecture

Sexuality & Adolescent Pregnancy.docx

8 Pages
43 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Child Development
Course
CD-0068
Professor
Tama Leventhal
Semester
Fall

Description
Sexuality & Adolescent Pregnancy 04/15/2014 Adolescent Transitions and Sex Cognitive Changes in conception of self (“Am I desirable?”) Hypothetical reasoning (“Should I?) Biological  Hormonal changes (increased sexual urges, especially for boys) Development of secondary sex characteristics (sexually attractive to each other) Pregnancy possible Social Behavior imbued with new meaning School norms best predictor of dating (particularly for girls) Developing interests in romantic partners  Mixing of sexes and spending more time with peers What does “The Sleepover Question” tell us about adolescent sexuality (and sexual socialization)? Hard for parents and children to talk about issue Rule against things happening “under my roof” Awkwardness Integrating new sexual identity into own personal identity – might be hard when you can’t talk to your family  about it Safer sex occurs when adolescents are open with families and families are receptive  Impact on family relationships Role in access to contraceptives  Addendum: Sleepover Question and Comparison of First Sexual Experiences US teens Both boys and girls wish they had waited longer, don’t feel in control Dutch teens Both boys and girls were ready, had fun, and went as far as they wanted to  Conception of sex in Netherlands differs greatly from US conception (e.g. open about saying sex is fun) Society’s Role in Sexuality Sexual socialization (Ford & Beach, 1951) Permissive Continuous process Open, allowed Restrictive Discontinuous process Genders are separated, very controlled  Semi­restrictive Semi­continuous process  Not discouraged but not actively encouraged, teen pregnancy frowned open Classified US as semi­restrictive in 1951 Are we still this way? More permissive now? Sexual Socialization in Contemporary US Society SEE SLIDE Trends in Sexual Activity during Adolescence Proportion of high school students who have had sex increased up to 1980 Plateaued from 1980 through 1990s and then decreased in 2000 Stayed stable from 2000 until now (but still higher than pre­1980) At What Age Do Adolescents Lose Their Virginity? Half of all teens had sexual intercourse by 11  grade Sex is normative and starting earlier  About 80% of girls and 90% of boys have had sex by 19 Gender Differences in Sequence of Sexual Activity Boys tend to reach each stage about 1.5 years before girls This study finds that intercourse precedes oral sex (but more contemporary studies find opposite) An update on teens and oral sex: higher percent of 9  graders had had oral sex than vaginal sex Is Sex a Problem Behavior?  Romantic vs. Non­romantic Partners Friends with benefits? After 1 year, virgins less depressed than those who had sex with: Romantic partner Non­romantic partner Both romantic and non­romantic partners But differences in expression present prior to teens becoming sexually active No negative repercussions after 5 years But early sexual activity (<16) may be problem  Risks associated with early sexual activity Compared with teens who delay sex, early sexual activity associated with: Acquisition of STDs Unintended pregnancy Engaging i
More Less

Related notes for CD-0068

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit