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Adolescence as Social Invention.docx

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Department
Child Development
Course
CD-0068
Professor
Tama Leventhal
Semester
Fall

Description
Adolescence as Social Invention 04/15/2014 What is a Social Transition? Process through which individual’s position redefined by society Marked by changes in social roles and status Adolescence as a Social Transition In all societies period in which individuals come to be recognized as adult Process less explicit in contemporary U.S. society than in traditional cultures Among US youth: “accepting responsibility for one’s self” Among Inuit adolescents in Canadian Arctic, establish marriage like relationship and independent  household  Earlier entry into adolescence and later exit  Questions What changes in yourself did you notice that told you that you were becoming an adult? How and why has modern society made it so difficult to make the transition to adulthood? Adolescence in US: The Social Invention th Prior to 19  Century Miniature adults Fostered out of their homes to live with others in an internship role or sent to boarding school (affluent) Schooling limited to affluent families  Why remove adolescents from the home? Adolescents sexually mature  Preparing for familial roles – support family financially, learn responsibilities Way to minimize conflict between parents and children  Marriage delayed Genders prepared separately for their roles Courtship supervised  Did not establish independent household until you had economic means to do so Median age at first marriage  1890s: men 26 and women 23 1950s: men 24 and women 20 (all­time low) 2010: men 28 and women 27 (all­time high & rising) Industrial Revolution (1890­192) Children used to be exploited as cheap labor, but now less need with manufacturing machines taking over Lots of kids with nothing to do, hanging out unsupervised on the streets Rise of compulsory schooling  Economic necessity – need to save jobs for adults Changed role of parents  Mothers entering workforce  Less time with children More time with peers  Mixing Of classes: children from all social backgro
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