Class Notes (836,949)
United States (324,842)
Music (29)
MUS-0035 (11)
Lecture

Sounds of Horror
Premium

4 Pages
53 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Music
Course
MUS-0035
Professor
Hannah Lewis
Semester
Spring

Description
Sounds of Horror: M Dir. Fritz Lang ­ German­Austrian filmmaker, screenwriter, and producer ­ Hired by a Berlin­based company to act in WWI ­ Thea von Harbou o Co­wrote his films from when they met to when they divorced ­ Conflicted ideals with Nazis o When they rose to power, Thea supported (and even joined) the party o Lang’s mother was Jewish▯divorce in 1932 ­ Moves to Paris for two years, then U.S., where he produced a long stream of Hollywood  films (ex. Metropolis, 1927) Expressionism ­ Credited as forerunner to horror and film noir genres ­ Late 19  century into early 20 th ­ No one supported movement except the artists, who’d meet up to discuss it ­ Originated from Viennese painting movement ­ Themes: impending doom, threats to society, instability o WWI, influenza epidemic, Austria­Hungarian empire ending ­ Painting characteristics o Human form, distortion, sharp lines, texture of skin, reshaping of colors, pure  emotion, disregard for conventional aesthetics (morbidity, eroticism) Expressionism in film ­ Later in Weimar film ­ Focus on light and shadow to: o Establish—and distort—mood/atmosphere; reveal narrative  Distortion as portraying inner, emotional reality of character  Set, lighting, and costume design using elements of expressionist painting  Exaggerated acting styles and extreme camera angles o Create images of shadow that are foreboding of evil o Create levels of truth (psychological element)  Inner level of reality of what the character is experiencing Three elements in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (murder scene) ­ Expressionist quality display instability of the main character, a patient in an insane asylum ­ Established mood/atmosphere, reveal narrative o Angular set divides the screen, foreboding atmosphere; allows audience to  anticipate action o Anything not lit is pitch black, giving sense of where one wrong step sends you o Makeup creates distorted inhuman faces o Lack of dialogue emphasizes daunting music o Blur of image gives sense that viewer isn’t getting full picture (dream­state  recollection of another character) ­ Shadow as evil o Literal use of shadows on walls; shadows on face reveal sinister intentions o Hiding in the shadows o Villain has dramatic, black makeup ­ Levels of truth/reality o Set is distorted, unrealistic o Exaggerated acting: man with knife, men jumping out of bed, man seeing woman  gone, etc. o Muted (no sound) M (1931) ­ Horror (influenced film noir) ­ Production problems because of the story, rise of Nazi party ­ Lang’s first sound film; filmed in six weeks ­ Conveyed a social message: keep an eye on your kids ­ Focuses o Complexity and originality of structure/theme  No one single protagonist; community vs. criminal o Fewer cuts  Sound informs narrative and audience would put two pieces together o Camera angles  Align with perspective (like in opening singing scene) o Use of discontinuity between shots to create space  Cutting between scenes of police call and investigation to piece together  the city into a cohesive whole ­ New Objectivity o Neue Sachlichkeit o Detailed rendering of objects (complex, geometrically ordered) o Sounds with weighted purpose (almost become an object) Scene analysis: Elsie Beckmann’s disappearance ­ People replaced with objects (dining table, attic, ball rolling) ­ Clock motif (recurring object, expressing how time is continuing, dragging on) ­ Interaction between characters and space/silence/death Absence and the Acousmatic ­ Gunning: “Absence imprints this film from the start and determined the way it uses sound  and constructs space” (165). ­ Gunning: “…the way a sound can open up an off­screen space, imprinting a space we see  on screen with the voice or sound coming from unseen space.” o Only here murderer’s whistling  Piece by Edvard Grieg • Norwegian composer and piani
More Less

Related notes for MUS-0035

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit