Class Notes (838,449)
United States (325,428)
Psychology (193)
PSY-0001 (107)
Lecture

chap 7 reading.docx

10 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0001
Professor
Sam Sommers
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 7 04/15/2014 Confabulation Schemas Blocking Semantic memory – memory for information Spreading activation model – there are nodes of information (e.g., hamburger, ice cream cone,  French fries) that are interconnected. The stronger the connection between nodes, the more likely that  activating one node will activate the other. In this case, see hamburger advertisements activates the  hamburger node, which is likely strongly linked to the French fries node (because hamburgers and French  fries are often found together in the world). Equipotentiality – idea that memories are distributed equally throughout the brain (partly true, partly  false)  Long­term memory selectivity – information that is important for survival and reproduction  Elaborative rehearsal  Maintenance rehearsal – repetition of information in short­term (working) memory, without analysis  of the deeper meaning of the information  Acoustic rehearsal Linkage rehearsal  Imaging Linking Visualization  Shadowing experiments –  The cocktail party phenomenon  7.1 Learning Objectives Describe the three phases of memory Identify brain regions involved in learning and memory Describe the processes of consolidation and reconsolidation What is Memory? Memory is the nervous system’s capacity to acquire and retain usable skills and knowledge  Enables organisms to take information from experiences and store it for retrieval at a later time Memory is the processing of information  Involves three phases Encoding: processing of information so that it can be stored Storage: retention of encoded information Retrieval: recall of previously encoded and stored information  Memory is the result of brain activity Multiple brain regions have been implicated in memory, including hippocampus, temporal lobes,  cerebellum, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and the brain structures involved in perception Consolidation ▯ immediate memories become lasting memories Reconsolidation ▯ memories may be altered Terms Memory: the nervous system’s capacity to acquire and retain skills and knowledge Encoding: the processing of information so that it can be stored Storage: the retention of encoded representations over time Retrieval: the act of recalling or remembering stored information when it is needed Consolidation: a process by which immediate memories become lasting (or long­term) memories Reconsolidation: neural processes involved when memories are recalled and then stored again for  later retrieval 7.2 Learning Objectives Distinguish between parallel processing and serial processing Describe filter theory Define change blindness How Does Attention Determine What We Remember? Visual attention works selectively and serially Simple searches for stimuli that differ in only one primary factor (e.g., shape, motion, size, color,  orientation) occur automatically and rapidly through parallel processing Searches for objects that are the conjunction of two or more properties (e.g., red and X­shaped) occur  slowly and serially Auditory attention allows us to listen selectively Can attend to more than one message at a time, but can’t do this well Weakly process some unattended information Selective attention allows us to filter incoming information Often do not notice large changes in an environment because we fail to pay attention Phenomenon called change blindness  Terms Parallel processing: processing multiple types of information at the same time Change blindness: a failure to notice large changes in one’s environment 7.3 Learning Objectives Distinguish between sensory memory, short­term memory, and long­term memory Describe working memory and chunking Review evidence that supports the distinction between working memory and long­term memory Explain how information is transferred from working memory to long­term memory How are Memories Maintained over Time? Sensory memory is brief Visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and tactile memories are maintained long enough to ensure  continuous sensory experiences Working memory is active Active processing system that keeps information available for current use Chunking reduces information into units that are easier to remember May be limited to as few as four chunks of information Long­term memory is relatively permanent and a virtually limitless store Information that is repeatedly retrieved, that is deeply processed, or that helps us adapt to an environment  is most likely to enter long­term memory  Terms Sensory memory: a memory system that very briefly stores sensory information in close to its original  sensory form Short­term memory: a memory storage system that briefly holds a limited amount of information in  awareness Working memory: an active processing system that keeps different types of information available for  current use Chunking: organizing information into meaningful units to make it easier to remember Long­term memory: the relatively permanent storage of information Serial position effect: the ability to recall items from a list depends on order of presentation, with  items presented early or late in the list remembered better than those in the middle  7.4 Learning Objectives Discuss the levels of processing model Explain how schemas influence memory Describe spreading activation models of memory Identify retrieval cues Identify common mnemonics How Is Information Organized in Long­Term Memory? Long­term memory is based on meaning Maintenance rehearsal involves repetition Elaborative rehearsal involves encoding information more meaningfully (ex. on the basis of semantic  meaning) Elaborative rehearsal more effective for long­term remembering than maintenance rehearsal  Schemas provide an organizational framework Cognitive structures that help people perceive, organize, and process information Influence memory Culture shapes schemas, so people from distinct cultures process information in different ways Information is stored in association networks Networks of associations are formed by nodes of information Nodes are linked together and activated through spreading activation  Retrieval cues provide access to long­term storage According to the encoding specificity principle, any stimulus encoded along with an experience can later  trigger the memory of the experien
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit