Class Notes (837,434)
United States (325,029)
Psychology (193)
PSY-0001 (107)
Lecture

election.docx

6 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0001
Professor
Sam Sommers
Semester
Fall

Description
Psychology and the Election 04/15/2014 Social Influence  When other people affect your thoughts, feelings, or behaviors  Can be subtle or overt  Can occur for informational reasons or normative reasons (related to social norms) Asch Studies (1955) Make judgments of line length (shown target line and three other lines ▯ which line is the same length as  the target?) One real participant is at a table with other people (who are researchers) People in group first say right answer and then start to say the wrong answer ▯ participant has to decide  whether to say what they know is right or go along with the group Participants knowingly give the wrong answer  ∕  of the time 3 ¾ of participants give at least one wrong answer  Conformity Altering behaviors or opinions to match those of others Sometimes occurs because we think others know the “right answer” (informational) Sometimes occurs in order to fit in (normative)  Presidential Debates Can see what other people think about the debate while it’s going on (in the middle of the screen, line  moves between + and –)  Supposed to come up with own opinions while be constantly presented with other peoples’ opinions Fein et al. (2007) Question 1: Does audience response influence viewers? Watched 1980 Reagan/Morgan debate  Shown 3 different edited versions of the debate One condition sees Reagan one­liners followed by laughter (how it occurred) One condition sees one­liners and laughter edited out  One condition sees one­liners, but laughter edited out  The audience response influenced viewers ▯ 1  group had best ratings, then 2 , then 3   rd Question 2: Does response of live viewing company influence viewers? Watched current debate One control condition room One room with pro­Democratic confederates (express some cheers for democrat and boos for republican) One room with pro­Republican confederates (express some cheers for republican and boos for democrat) The live viewing response does influence viewers  In control group, Clinton thought to have done better When students were in the pro­Clinton room, thought he did significantly better When students were in the pro­democrat room, thought Clinton still did better but not as well as control Question 3: Do on­screen data influence viewers Watched Reagan/Morgan debate One condition sees pro­Reagan information One condition sees pro­Morgan information  On­screen data did influence viewers Group that saw pro­Reagan information rated Reagan higher Group that saw pro­Morgan information rated Morgan higher Stress and US Presidents Some think that stress causes presidents to age at faster rate than normal because hair grays seemingly  quickly (e.g. Clinton, Bush, and Obama)  Scientific understanding Hair turns gray due to age­related loss of melanin Recent research suggests graying may be caused by buildup of hydrogen peroxide The age at which hair grays is largely determined by genes (probably more so than by stress) Can start between 30­50 years old By 50, about 50% of Caucasians are about 50% gray Average age at inauguration is 55 years (starting at time when graying tends to become visible) Do US presidents gray faster than normal? How could we design a study to address this? Difficult (would take a really long time if starting now)  Would need a group of presidents and non­presidents  Does stress speed up the hair graying process generally? Epinephrine and norepinephrine could speed up this process via DNA damage  Should also lead to stress­related diseases in US presidents  Do presidents have a shorter life expectancy? Olshanksy et al. (2011)  Recorded the lifespans of US presidents and compare them to average lifespans of men from the same  time periods  The majority of presidents who died of natural causes lived several years longer than expected based on  their age cohort Results
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit