Class Notes (838,407)
United States (325,393)
Psychology (193)
PSY-0001 (107)
Lecture

14 reading.docx

7 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0001
Professor
Sam Sommers
Semester
Fall

Description
04/15/2014 14.1 How Are Psychological Disorders Conceptualized and Classified? Psychopathology is different from everyday problems Individuals with psychological  disorders behave in ways that deviate from cultural norms and that are  maladaptive  Psychological disorders are classified into categories Five axes used for evaluation of mental health (from tDSM )  Major clinical disorders Mental retardation and personality disorders Medical conditions Psychosocial problems Global assessment Psychological disorders must be assessed Assessment is the process of examining a person’s mental functions and psychological health to make a  diagnosis Accomplished through interviews, behavioral observation, psychological testing and neuropsychological  testing Psychological disorders have many causes The diathesis­stress model suggests that mental heath problems arise from a vulnerability coupled with a  stressful precipitation event They may arise from biological factors, psychological factors, or cognitive behavioral factors Females are more likely than males to exhibit internalizing disorders (such as major depression and  generalized anxiety disorder) Males are more likely than females to exhibit externalizing disorders (such as alcoholism and conduct  disorders) Most mental disorders show some universal symptoms, but the  DSM  recognizes a number of cultural­ bound mental health problems  Terms Psychopathology: sickness or disorder of the mind Etiology: factors that contribute to the development of a disorder Multiaxial system: the system used in the  DSM ; it calls for assessment along five axes that describe  important mental health factors  Assessment: examination of a person;s mental state to diagnose possible psychological disorders Diathesis­stress model: a diagnostic model that proposes that a disorder may develop when an  underlying vulnerability is coupled with a precipitating event Family systems model: a diagnostic model that considers symptoms with an an individual as  indicating problems within the family Sociocultural model: a diagnostic model that views psychopathology as the result of the interaction  between individuals and their cultures Cognitive­behavioral approach: a diagnostic model that views psychopathology as the result of  learned, maladaptive thoughts and beliefs 14.2  Can Anxiety Be the Root of Seemingly Different Disorders? Different types of anxiety disorders Phobias are exaggerated fears of specific stimuli Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is diffuse and omnipresent PTSD involves frequent and recurring nightmares, intrusive thoughts, and flashbacks related to an earlier  trauma Panic attacks cause sudden overwhelming terror and may lead to agoraphobia OCD involves frequent intrusive thoughts and compulsive behaviors  Cognitive, situational, and biological components  All these factors contribute to the onset of anxiety disorders For example, OCD is influenced by conditioning and genetics and may be induced in children exposed to a  streptococcal infection that causes autoimmune damage to the brain Terms Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): a diffuse state of constant anxiety not associated with any  specific object or event Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): a mental disorder that involves frequent nightmares,  intrusive thoughts, and flashbacks related to an earlier trauma  Panic disorder: an anxiety disorder that consists of sudden, overwhelming attacks of terror Agoraphobia: an anxiety disorder marked by fear of being in situations in which escape may be difficult  or impossible Obsessive­compulsive disorder (OCD): an anxiety disorder characterized by frequent intrusive  thoughts and compulsive actions  14.3  Are Mood Disorders Extreme Manifestations of Normal Moods  Two categories of mood disorders: major depression and bipolar disorder Major depression is characterized by a number of symptoms, including depressed mood and a loss of  interest in pleasurable activities Depression is more common in females than in males and is most common among women in developing  countries Bipolar disorder is characterized by depression and manic episodes, which are episodes of increased  activity and euphoria  Cognitive, situational, and biological components  Both depression and bipolar disorder are, in part, genetically determined The biological factors implicated in depression are neurotransmitter (MAO, serotonin) levels, frontal lobe  functioning, and biological rhythms Poor interpersonal relations and maladaptive cognitions, including the ognitive triad  and learned  helplessness, also contribute to depression  Terms Major depression: a disorder characterized by severe negative moods or a lack of interest in normally  pleasurable activities Dysthymia: a form of depression that is not severe enough to be diagnosed as major depression Bipolar disorder: a mood disorder characterized by alternating periods of depression and mania Learned helplessness: a cognitive model of depression in which people feel unable to control events  in their lives 14.
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit