Class Notes (834,541)
United States (323,821)
Psychology (193)
PSY-0009 (3)
Lecture

March 13 Notes 1.docx

5 Pages
69 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0009
Professor
Gina Kuperberg
Semester
Spring

Description
March 13, 2014 and March 27, 2014 Linking Approaches II: Different Approaches in Cognitive Science to Studying  Comprehension Embodied cognition: are representations abstract things, or when you retrieve the meaning, do  you retrieve something that you can actually do with the object (taste it, smell it, etc.)  Need to link concepts to form (conceptual to phonology); mechanism for linking = lexical access  Marr’s Levels of Analysis (review) • Different levels of problem solving o Computational – what is the problem that the system solves?  o Algorithmic – what are the representations and processes used to carry out these  computations? o Implementation – what’s the hardware you will use to solve the problem?  BUT real research doesn’t necessarily work in this type of logical order. And, as we’ve seen,  cognitive psychology, neuroscience, computational modeling are different fields, carried out by  different researchers…who don’t always speak to each other.  Hence, the need for Cognitive  Science Part 1: what are the representations and processes used to understand these sentences?  (Algorithmic) o Every morning at breakfast the boys would eat… o Every morning at breakfast the boys would plant… o Every morning at breakfast the eggs would eat… o First, what are the representations used to understand these sentences?   For this, we need theories of representation  • What representations do we store in memory?? (Associations,  schemas, event structures) o Association of morning/breakfast with eat (schema and  stored knowledge about likely events)  o Associative knowledge (ex: eggs is related to breakfast;  plant is not related to breakfast)  • Linguistics: words (and all the representations that make up a  word!) o In order to understand “breakfast,” you need to understand  “break” and “fast” (morphological structure) o Features of the word – egg: round, smooth, etc.  • Linguistics: Structure (e.g. word order, parts of speech)  o Syntactic structure: role of eggs vs. role of boys (also  semantic structure)  o Background about the representation of events: who does what to whom (agents,  patients/themes)  Abstract representations of who does what to whom in order to understand  if the sentence makes sense or not  • In “eggs would eat,” the semantic properties of the agent (eggs)  violate the semantic properties of the verb (eat).  This is known as  a “selection restriction violation”  o Eat requires an animate object  o What are the processes used to understand these sentences? Cognitive Psychology   Long­term memory  Lexical access  Combining words together  Working memory  Facilitation (e.g. Priming)  Conflict, competition, inhibition  Top­down processing; Bottom­up processing  • If everything in the sentence is as expected, top­down will do all  the work; if it’s unexpected, you use more bottom­up and semantic  processing   Use working memory to process this sentence as you hear it word by word   Expectations: as you go further into the sentence, expectations become  more specific (use long term memory – make expectations easier as it goes  further into the sentence) • Just a bit more background about conflict and inhibition:  o The Stroop Effect: conflict between pre­potent (highly active) representation and  another type of representation you need to retrieve o RED RED RED RED RED  1. Every morning at breakfast the boys would eat… 2. Every morning at breakfast the boys would plant… 3. Every morning at breakfast the eggs would eat… Results:  o Longer to read the verb in 2 than 1 o Even longer to read the verb in 3 than 2 o Why?  Switching from reality to fantasy (eggs eating)  More prediction violation for eat than for plant   Eggs and eat are related, so it takes you longer to realize there’s something  wrong compared to breakfast and plant, which you immediately realize is  wrong (more of a garden path)  Eggs as a subject has fewer noun options than boys does  Eggs can’t eat (impossible), but boys can plant (possible) Part 2: fMRI data – revisit ERPs: the N400 and P600 (Implementation level) o ERP, EEG o What can it tell you?  Measure of neuronal activity with excellent temporal resolution on surface  of scalp  Synaptic activity: summed EPSPs and IPSPs from pyramidal cells
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0009

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit