Class Notes (838,116)
United States (325,303)
Psychology (193)
PSY-0012 (27)
Lecture

Personality Disorders.docx

15 Pages
27 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0012
Professor
Jackquelyn Mascher
Semester
Fall

Description
Personality Disorders 04/15/2014 Personality Basics There are many personality theories All frameworks complement one another Remember, the DSM is a  diagnostic  manual – diagnostic symptoms of personality Personality studies: states vs. traits, continuity vs. discontinuity, etc. Personality definition Patterns (continuities, discontinuities) of interacting with world (people, things, situations) consistent over  time and context Personality Disorder (PD) Must be over 18 years old in practice/ethically (not technically in DSM that you  have to be over 18 to have a personality disorder) Longstanding, pervasive, inflexible, distressing patterns of thought, feeling, behavior in relation to  environment At least one pathological trait (domain or facet) Not better accounted for by something else (drugs, medical problem, other mental illness, sociocultural  environment) Biopsychosocial model applies to this developmentally Generally impacted by early stage parenting failure Biopsychosocial Model: Gender Effects Some personality disorders have notable gender difference Disorder ▯ gender ratio Narcissistic  ▯ overwhelmingly more in men Borderline PD  ▯ overwhelmingly more in females  Definition of “Disordered’ When’s a personality actually disordered? (not in DSM) Unusually extreme traits Problematic traits Interactive traits Stability of symptom­traits Ego­syntonic symptom­traits Unusually extreme traits Very low on trait or very high on trait (top or bottom 1 or 2%) leads to personality disorder (huge portion of  personality is within normal limits) Personality disorder: patterns of thought, feeling, and behavior beyond the normal range of psychological  variation Problematic traits May cause some suffering for patient such as anxiety, depression, and confusion Usually causes major impairment for patient such as relationships and job struggles Causes major distress and confusion for others such as spouses, employers, friends, and former friends Interactive traits Personality disorder means that symptoms manifest in interactions with other people Other people must be present (or absent) for the full expression of psychological symptoms The pathology IS in the self­other dynamic (interpersonal) Stability of symptom­traits The cluster of symptoms are, by definition, stable (precursors for disorder in childhood) Symptoms may be first visible in childhood, but one cannot be diagnosed with PD until age 18 Symptoms persist throughout life Ego­syntonic symptom­traits Symptoms in harmony with patient’s ideal self­image Low self­awareness Patients believe symptoms are valued or normal aspects of their personalities  (value and want to hold on to their disordered qualities) Patients see others as disordered Ego­syntonic means it never occurs to you that you are the problem Shows big difference between someone with severe trauma history who has disordered behavior (doesn’t  understand behavior or feels pain) Criteria in DSM Diagnosing personality disorder: two ways to do it in the DSM 5 Categorical rubric (yes/no) Dimensional rubric (ratings) Categorical rubric 3 clusters, 10 disorders Cluster A (odd/eccentric) Paranoid – distrust and suspiciousness of others Schizoid – detachment from social relationships and restricted range of emotional expression Schizotypal – lack of capacity for close relationships, cognitive distortions, and eccentric behavior Cluster B (dramatic/erratic) Antisocial – disregard for and violation of the rights of others Borderline – instability of interpersonal relationships, self­image, and affect, and marked impulsivity Histrionic – excessive emotionality and attention seeking Narcissistic – grandiosity, need for admiration, and lack of empathy Cluster C (anxious/fearful) Avoidant – social inhibition, feelings of inadequacy, and hypersensitivity to negative evaluation Dependent – excessive need to be taken care of, submissive behavior, and fears of separation Obsessive­compulsive – preoccupation with order, perfection, and control Cluster A Personality Disorders Paranoid PD 4 or more Suspects that others will harm, exploit, or deceive (but not necessarily anxious or delusional) Preoccupied with doubts about loyalty, trustworthiness Secretive; reluctant to confide due to fears of maliciousness Interprets others as demeaning, find threatening meaning in benign events Persistently bears grudges; unforgiving of slights Perceives attacks on character or reputation; not apparent to others; quick to anger or counterattack Recurrent suspicions of infidelity of intimate partner Patient lacks sufficient basis for above perceptions No hallucinations or full blown delusions Schizoid PD 4 or more Neither desires nor enjoys close relationships Almost always chooses solitary activities Appears indifferent to praise or criticism Emotional coolness, detachment, aloofness, flat affect Lacks close friends other than relatives Little interest in sexual experiences Lacks pleasure in most, if not all, activities Usually denies need for relationships unless useful Schizotypal PD 5 or more Interpersonal difficulties (“I don’t need other people”) Odd beliefs or magical thinking like superstitions, special powers, bizarre fantasy Odd speech (thinking) Constricted or inappropriate affect (lack of full range of feelings) Odd or eccentric appearance, behavior Lack of close friends (other than relatives), seen as entertaining Excessive social anxiety due to paranoia (not judgment) Links to schizophrenia (examples) Relatives of schizophrenics at greater risk for schizotypal PD People with schizotypal PD show similarities to schizophrenics (biologically) Cognitive and neuropsychological deficits Enlarged ventricles Less temporal gray matter Cluster B Personality Disorders Antisocial PD 3 or more Failure to conform to laws, social norms Deceit (lies, aliases, conning for profit or pleasure) Irritability and aggression, repeated physical assault Reckless disregard for safety of self or others  Consistent irresponsibility in key life areas Lack of remorse; indifferent to harming others Specify evidence of conduct disorder before age 15 Pervasive disregard for rights of others since age 15 Arousal profile and psychopathy Lack of fear, shame, anxiety in situations that would normally cause such emotions (can appear to be  ashamed when caught, but just regret they got caught) Low baseline levels of skin conductance Low arousal in general Need for intense stimulation Predictors Poverty of emotion Demonstrate lack of most negative emotions Positive affect used to manipulate others (faking emotion) Childhood indicators of sociopathy – “the big 3” Harm to vulnerable others (younger children, animals) – joy and arousal Bedwetting Fire­setting Family environment Lack of warmth, with negativity, emotional neglect (although may appear high­functioning) Poverty, violence, inconsistent discipline or no discipline Marital problems of parents and substance abuse Borderline PD (BPD) 5 or more Unstable, stormy, intense relationships Splitting others; idealizes then devalues others Terrified of rejection in all relationships, but seems to 
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0012

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit