Class Notes (837,550)
United States (325,103)
Psychology (312)
PSY 101 (146)
Lecture 3

Psychology 101 Lecture 3.4.14 - Organizational Processes in Perception

3 Pages
169 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
PSY101 Lecture – 3.4.14  Organizational Processes in Perception  What determines the focus of our attention?  Two Major components:  Goal directed selection: (endogenous att.) : purposeful direction of attention  toward those things in the environment that help to achieve desired outcome  Stimulus­driven capture: (exogenous att.) : objects in the environment grab your  attention and direct your senses toward a particular form of input  Attention Processes  ­Many things are available in your environment that provide perceptual information, but  your attention focuses on a subset of these things  ­We are able to direct our awareness in ways that afford us the ability to allocate our  resources toward objects/environments  ­People often have difficulty noticing changes across views of a scene  ­Youtube clips trying to spot changes in environment  Principles of Perceptual Grouping  ­A critical component of perceptual processes for dealing with the world is determining  figure (object) and ground (backdrop)  Gestalt psychology: school of psychology pioneered in the early mid 20  century –  maintains that psychological phenomena achieve understanding when organized as  collective, structured wholes – not when broken down into basic, elemental components  ­The whole is different than the sum of its parts  5 Laws: 1) Proximity: grouping of most proximal elements in view  2) Similarity: grouping of elements that are most similar  3) Continuity: experience lines as continuous despite interruption  4) Closure: gaps are filled to give the experience of a whole object that we see  5) Contiguity: grouping of objects that have the appearance of moving in the same  direction – involves both time and space  Depth Perception  ­How do we deal with objects in 3D space? What cues are important for us in  determining the distance of an object  ­Binocular depth cues: are those that involve comparisons of the info. That arrives at  your two eyes  ­retinal disparity: disparity in the place of your two eyes relates to having two  different images projected on the retina; your brain makes sense of this disparity  by combining these 2 offset images for perception of a 3D world – depth  ­convergence: tells us about depth by forcing your eyes to converge more when  an object is closer to you  ­Monocular depth cues: provide info. From just one eye about the distance of an object  ­interposition: closer object blocks the view of an object t
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit