Class Notes (834,152)
United States (323,640)
Psychology (312)
PSY 101 (146)
Lecture 3

Psychology 101 Lecture 3.11.14 - Learning

3 Pages
120 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
PSY 101 Lecture 3.11.13 Learning  Learning: a process based on experience that results in a relatively consistent, permanent  change in behavior or behavior potential  ­We may build on things we’ve learned, but we do not “undo” learning  Habituation: decrease in a behavioral response as a result of a repeated stimulus  presentation – sensory adaptation, but for learned behaviors  Ex: you no longer express sadness following a depressing scene after so many views Sensitization: increase in behavioral response as a result of a repeated stimulus  presentation – stimulus is consistent, but you become more sensitive to it  rd th st Ex: quicker to hit snooze button following the 3  or 4  alarm than after the 1 Classical Conditioning Organisms learn to use predictable signals in their environment that cue the onset of  events ­ A researcher can classically condition an animal to respond with a certain  behavior when a paired stimulus is present (training procedures)  Ivan Pavlov: Russian physiologist/psychologist – accidentally discovered classical  conditioning while conducting research on digestion in dogs: ­wanted to study bodily secretions at times of feeding  ­noticed that the dogs were salivating prior to being fed – salvation was being  triggered by the sight of food, sound of footsteps, etc. – the dogs started to learn  that when they see/hear a certain thing, they will soon be fed – called this the  conditioned reflex  ­concluded that learning may result from the paired association of two stimuli  Initial State: prior to conditioning a dog to drool in response to the sound of a tuning  fork – food elicits salivation, tuning fork does not  During Conditioning: present food immediately after striking the tuning fork over many  repeated exposures  ­at this time, drooling is still in response to the presentation of food (i.e., still an  unconditioned response) During Conditioned State: unconditioned response (drooling) becomes a conditioned  response when it is first elicited by the conditioned stimulus (tuning fork) in the absence  of the unconditioned stimulus (food)  Unconditioned Stimulus: Food  Unconditioned Response: Drooling for food Conditioned Stimulus: Tuning Fork  Conditioned Response: Drooling for the tuning fork in the absence of food  Acquisition: is said to have occurred when the conditioned response (drooling) is first  elicited by the conditioned stimulus (tuning fork) – acquisition is the result  Extinction: is observed as the weakening of a conditioned association as a result of the  absence of the unconditioned stimulus (food) – learning falls away  Spontaneous Recovery: an event observed by a reappearance of the extinguished  conditioned response after a period of time has passed  Operant Conditioning  Not in contrast to conditional, just exists on its own  Organisms can learn about consequences of their behavior and use those experiences to  help guide future voluntary behavior  Operant conditioning is said to have occurred when the probability of a response is  changed by a change in the consequences of having made that response – making claims  on whether or not we expect them to respond in that way based on the change in  consequences  Thorndike invented a puzzle chamber to demonstrate that animals can learn about  consequences of their behavior  ­motivated by food, animals look for ways to get out of the box, animal h
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit