Class Notes (837,327)
United States (324,963)
Psychology (312)
PSY 101 (146)
Lecture 4

PSY 101 Lecture 4.3.14 - Cognitive Processes/Language

3 Pages
50 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
PSY 101 Lecture 4.3.14  Cognitive Processes  Cognition involves mental processes in perceiving, knowing, attending, remembering,  and reasoning – affords us opportunities in problem solving, the use of a language  faculty, and memory  Reaction Time: a measure often used to make claims about the duration and number of  mental steps required to carry out a specific task  ­increased RT, increased number of mental steps  ­Ex: “Same or different” exercise – greater angular difference = increased  reaction time ­tradeoff between accuracy and time limit  Processes of Mind  Serial Processes: 2+ mental processes carried out sequentially, one at a time  Parallel Processes: 2+ mental processes carried out simultaneously  Controlled Processes: requires attention (ex: asking a question in class), often performed  in serial  Automatic Processes:  do not require attention (ex: covering your mouth when you  cough), often performed in parallel  Problem Solving and Reasoning  Heuristics: learned strategies that rely on inference used as shortcuts in problem solving  – simple rules that people use to help make decisions, “rule of thumb”  ­Ex: Pac­Man avoids ghosts with exception for times when…? Occlusion heuristic: when an object is partially covered by a smaller occluding object,  the larger one is seen as continuing behind the smaller ocular  Deductive Reasoning: a form of reasoning that applies logical rules to draw conclusions  about real world relationships (premises)  ­reasoning from general to specific – the form of the argument leads us to draw a  certain conclusion; logic  ­Ex: If all politicians are crooks, and Barack Obama is a politician, then Barack  Obama is a crook  Inductive Reasoning: a form of reasoning that uses probabilities to draw conclusions  based on available evidence and past experience  ­reasoning from specific to general ­Ex: taking a specific bad experience with customer service, and coming to the  conclusion that customer service has gotten bad over the years  Language Language is a system of communicating that uses psycholinguistic segments and  sequences of segments in the form of sounds or symbols; affords us opportunity to  express states of mind (ex: feelings, thoughts, beliefs, etc.)  ­Communication is one of the main features, but it is not sufficient to claim language  (i.e., other animals communicate by different ways than spoken language) Speech and Language Ways of representing a physical speech signal:  ­Acoustic: frequency (pitch), intensity (amplitude/loudness)  ­Auditory: shape of waveform (oscillogram)  ­Phonetic features: related to sounds that comprise words (e.g. burst, VOT,  intonation)  Abstract forms of representation:  ­Phonemes: speech sounds (specific to particular language), smallest units of  sound in spoken language, English used about 45­ the sounds that some of our  letters make ­Morphemes: basic units of meaning – Ex: “pretested” has three morphemes:  pre­, test, a
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit