Class Notes (834,952)
United States (323,984)
Psychology (312)
PSY 101 (146)
Lecture 4

PSY 101 Lecture 4.10.14 - Development cont. and Motivation

4 Pages
116 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
PSY 101 Lecture 4.10.14 Development – cont.  Language Acquisition  Developmental milestones­  0­6 months:  ­cooing (no auditory input needed, deaf babies can coo)  ­discrimination of vowels  ­babbling present by 6 months  6­12 months:  ­babbling expands to be more language like and more tuned to native language,  gestures used  ­first words toward end of first year  12­18 months:  ­understanding of approx. 50 words; simple words and phrases  ­performatives (e.g., bye­bye)  ­nouns  3­4 years:  ­inflection not used consistently until about 2.5 years  ­utterances become longer at approx. 3­4 morphemes per sentence on average 5­6 years:  ­vocabulary reaches approx. 10,000 words ­frequent use of ‘simple’ sentences  6­8 years:  ­conversational skills show rapid improvement  9­11 years:  ­conversational strategizing  ­usage of synonyms and antonyms  11­14 years:  ­vocabulary incorporates more abstract forms  ­understanding of complex grammar, metaphor, and satire  14+ years:  ­adult vocabulary with about 40­50,000 words Mental Representation in Development  ­Representational change in theory of mind: what we think other people know given  specific contexts ­We can look to developmental observations to investigate instances when children  fail/succeed to represent what info is in the minds of others  ­Kids cannot change their representation from what they know now – video  testing a child on what they think is in a crayon box  Social Development  ­Erickson proposed the idea of successive psychosocial stages that focus on the  relationship between the development of the self and the world in which the self develops  ­Erickson outlined 8 stages that describe social development across the life span  ­He viewed each stage as a crisis or conflict that is to be resolved by the developing  individual  Stages:  Trust vs. Mistrust: (0­1.5 years) – infant needs to establish a trusting relationship with  caregivers  ­resolution: sense of security, trust  ­non­resolution: anxiety, insecurity  Autonomy vs. Self Doubt: (1.5­3 years) – develop a sense of self of independence with  respect to the environment  ­resolution: perception of being in control of own body  ­non­resolution: excessive restriction or criticism can discourage child and lead to  self­doubts, feelings of inadequacy  Initiative vs. Guilt: (3­5 years) – Caregivers respond to child’s self­initiated activities in  varying ways; child needs to have encouraged sense of freedom  ­resolution: confidence in self as initiator or creator of events  ­non resolution: feelings devoid of self­worth; apprehension to explore world Confidence vs. Inferiority: (6yrs­puberty) – develop competencies as they relate to  motor, intellectual, and social skills  ­resolution: adequacy in basic competency skills (athletics, intellectual  stimulation, etc.)  ­non resolution: feelings that lack confidence; failure­avoidance Identity vs. Confusion: (adolescence) – developing a sense of self; foundation with a  central, stable core; forming one’s own identity  ­resolution: comfortable sense of self that persists among many different roles in a  social world  ­non resolution: unclear sense of self; fragmented or shifting identities; poor self­ image  Intimacy vs. Isolation: (early adult) – from meaningful emotional, moral, and sexual  commitments; accept compromises; responsibilities  ­resolution: capacity to connect with others in ways that are psycho­ physiologically meaningful  ­
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit