Class Notes (838,036)
United States (325,277)
Psychology (312)
PSY 101 (146)
Lecture 4

PSY101 Lecture 4.22.14

3 Pages
107 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
PSY101 Lecture 4.22.14  Personality  Personality: refers to a person’s unique, complex, set of psychological qualities  ­Individualized blueprint; characteristic patterns of behavior that emerge in various  situations at different times  Projective measures: viewer is shown a series of ambiguous images and is asked to  verbally respond  ­Rorschach Inkblot Test – what might this inkblot look like to you? ­Thematic Apperception Test – tell me a story based on this picture  Personality traits are enduring personal qualities that characterize behavior across  situations – run along continuous dimensions that describe patterns of observed behavior  Five­Factor Model: five broad psychological dimensions­ each dimension potentially  representing many traits brought together to form a single, representative personality  ­each dimension has two poles; at each end is an opposing characteristic of the  factored dimension  Factor One: Extroversion (vs. Introversion – only one single measure of extroversion):  energetic, talkative, assertive vs. quiet, reserved, shy  Factor Two: Agreeableness: sympathetic, kind, affectionate vs. cold, cruel,  confrontational Factor Three: Conscientiousness: organized, intellectual, open­minded vs. easy­going,  careless, irresponsible Factor Four: Neuroticism: stable, contended, oriented vs. anxious, irritable,  temperamental  Factor Five: Openness to Experience: creative, adventurous vs. simple, shallow,  resistant to change  Across the Lifespan  Is personality more consistent at some points in the life span?  ­Evidence indicates that personality is least stable during childhood, and  consistency increases with age (change the least when you are older – have  already had many of your new experiences; found out what works, etc.) Structure of Personality Freud proposed a structure with three parts:  Id: governed by the “pleasure principle,” seeks immediate gratification devoid of  rationality  Superego: The “conscience” of the mind; moral attitudes and values – doing what is  “right”  Ego: governed by the “reality principle,” self­preservation by conscious executive  (decision maker) – mediator between the id and the superego  Defense Mechanisms  The ego works to avoid being overwhelmed by threatening impulses and ideas; it does so  by implementing defense mechanisms  ­help to cope with powerful inner conflicts  Denial: protecting self from unpleasant truths by refusing to acknowledge that the event  took place – denying the truth despite available evidence  Displacement: lashing out to release pent­up hostilities on objects or persons that are not  affiliated with the initial emotional event  ­placing fault on non­related noun; blaming others for own s
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit